Murphy Deming College of Health Sciences

Linda Seestedt-Stanford, Vice President of Health Sciences

 

  • Our Mission[C]WP_MurDem_Opening_6-16-17-2014_074-W

    The mission of the Murphy Deming College of Health Sciences is to prepare compassionate and ethical health professionals that strive for excellence through interprofessional collaboration that is responsive to a never-changing global environment. This will be accomplished by fostering a dynamic learning community dedicated to innovative teaching and learning, engaged scholarship, and service.

    Graduate Programs in Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Physician Assistant 

    Mary Baldwin College will offer three graduate programs in the health sciences:

    • Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD)
    • Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)
    • Master of Science in Physician Assistant (MSPA) — begins Fall 2015

    Health sciences graduate programs are nonresidential and will be offered at the new MBC satellite campus in Fishersville, VA, 7.6 miles from Staunton. Students enrolled in these programs are admitted once a year, are full-time, year-round students, and must maintain continuous enrollment throughout the duration of the program.

    The information provided is subject to change. The most up-to-date information is posted on the web page.

    Accreditation

    All programs have initiated the appropriate professional accreditation process. The information below is current as of printing, however, our most-current accreditation information can be found on our website.

    SACSCOC

    Our application to offer doctoral level programs was approved by SACSCOC (Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges) in December 2012.

    CAPTE

    Effective November 6, 2013, Mary Baldwin College has been granted Candidate for Accreditation status by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA, 22314; phone: 703-706-3245; email: accreditation@apta.org). Candidacy is not an accreditation status nor does it assure eventual accreditation. Candidate for Accreditation is a pre-accreditation status of affiliation with the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education that indicates the program is progressing toward accreditation.

    ARC-PA

    Mary Baldwin College has applied for Accreditation – Provisional from the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA). Mary Baldwin College/Murphy Deming College of Health Sciences anticipates matriculating its first class in August 2015, pending Accreditation – Provisional in March 2015. Accreditation – Provisional is an accreditation status for a new PA program that has not yet enrolled students, but at the time of its initial accreditation review, has demonstrated its preparedness to initiate a program in accordance with the accreditation Standards.

    In the event the Physician Assistant Program is not granted Accreditation, all application fees, tuition or other fees paid to Mary Baldwin College/Murphy Deming College of Health Sciences will be refunded in full, and the Program will not commence. Provided Accreditation-Provisional is granted, Mary Baldwin College/Murphy Deming College of Health Sciences Physician Assistant Studies Program anticipates accepting a class size not to exceed 45 students.

    ACOTE

    The entry-level occupational therapy doctoral degree program has applied for accreditation and has been granted Candidacy Status by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449. ACOTE’s telephone number c/o AOTA is (301) 652-AOTA and its Web address is www.acoteonline.org. Once accreditation of the program has been obtained, its graduates will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapist administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be an Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). In addition, most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination. Note that a felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure.

  • Admission

    Admission Requirements/Process for the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program

    Application cycle begins: July 2014
    Application deadline: January 15, 2015

    ❑ College Transcripts:  A bachelor’s degree is required prior to enrollment.

    ❑ Application:  Applications will be accepted online through the Occupational Therapy Centralized Application Service (OTCAS) once the application cycle has begun.

    Application Fee:  In addition to the OTCAS fee, a non-refundable supplemental fee of $45 is required.

    GRE:  GRE must have been taken within five years of application to our program.

    Prerequisite Courses:

    Required Courses Credit Hours Comments
    Introduction to Biology 3–4 Lab recommended
    Human or Vertebrate Anatomy 3–4 Lab recommended
    Human or Vertebrate Physiology 3–4 Lab recommended
    Introduction to Psychology 3
    Abnormal Psychology 3
    Introduction to Sociology or Anthropology 3
    Lifespan Human Development 3 Birth to Death
    Introduction to Research Methods 2 Qualitative or Quantitative Research, Statistics, or Research Methods
    Medical Terminology 1–2 A medical terminology certificate could be used to fulfill the pre-requisite requirement for this coursework.

    GPA:  A minimum of 3.0 overall GPA required. We expect that most accepted students will surpass this minimum. In addition, all prerequisite courses must reflect a “C” or better.

    References:  Three references are required (submitted via OTCAS). At least one reference must be from an occupational therapist and one reference from a college professor who can attest to your ability to enter a competitive professional program.

    OT Observation Hours:  40 hours are required to explore occupational therapy as a career in at least two different settings. Information on how to provide this information can be found on the OTCAS application form.

    Essay:  The OTCAS application form will require a brief personal essay.

    Interview:  The Admissions Committee will send invitations to selected candidates to interview. Not all applicants will be invited to interview. An interview does not guarantee acceptance into the program.

    Before registering for classes, students must provide:

    • Criminal background checks (federal requirement for all persons working with vulnerable populations) at student expense
    • Signed Technical Standards document
    • Written verification of immunizations

    After classes start, and in preparation for clinical placements, students must also provide:

    • Written verification of health insurance
    • Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Providers certification from the American Heart Association
    • Any additional requirements as stated by specific health care agencies (such as drug screening, additional criminal background checks, etc.) at student expense

    Admission Requirements/Process for the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program

    Application cycle begins: July 2014
    Application deadline: December 1, 2014

    College Transcripts:  A bachelor’s degree is required prior to enrollment.
    Application:  Applications will be accepted online through the Physical Therapy Centralized Application Service (PTCAS) once the application cycle has begun.
    Application Fee:  In addition to the PTCAS fee,a non-refundable supplemental fee of $45 is required.
    GRE:  GRE must have been taken within five years of application to our program.
    Prerequisite Courses:

    Required Courses Credit Hours Comments
    Human or Vertebrate Anatomy 4* Lab recommended
    Human or Vertebrate Physiology 4* Lab recommended
    Biology 3 At least one course; Upper level biology such as cell biology or histology are recommended, but not required.
    Chemistry 8 Must include labs
    Physics 8 General physics, must include labs
    Psychology 6 1 intro and 1 upper or 2 upper level psychology courses; Abnormal and developmental psychology are preferred.
    Statistics 3 Can be from biology, mathematics, psychology, or business; NOTE: if a psychology course is used to meet this requirement it cannot also be used for the psychology requirement.

    *Can be combined A/P for 8 credits, but must include labs

    GPA:  A minimum of 3.0 overall GPA required. We expect that most accepted students will surpass this minimum. In addition, all prerequisite courses must reflect a “C” or better.
    References:  Two references are required. At least one reference must be from a physical therapist. The online application will provide a form for you to send to your references.
    PT Observation Hours:  40 hours are required in at least two different settings, such as hospital inpatient, outpatient, pediatrics, long-term care, etc.  Instructions on how to provide this information can be found on the online application form.
    Essay:  The PTCAS application form will require a brief personal essay.
    Interview:  The Admissions Committee will send invitations to selected candidates to interview. Not all applicants will be invited to interview. An interview does not guarantee acceptance into the program.

    Before registering for classes, students must provide:

    • Criminal background checks (federal requirement for all persons working with vulnerable populations) at student expense
    • Signed Technical Standards document
    • Written verification of immunizations

    After classes start, and in preparation for clinical placements, students must also provide:

    • Written verification of health insurance
    • Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Providers certification from the American Heart Association
    • Any additional requirements as stated by specific health care agencies (such as drug screening, criminal background check, etc.) at student expense

    Admission Requirements/Process for the Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies Program (begins Fall 2015)

    Application cycle begins: April 2014
    Application deadline: December  1, 2014

    College Transcripts:  A bachelor’s degree is required prior to enrollment.
    Application:  Applications will be online through the Centralized Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA), once the application cycle has begun.
    Application Fee:  In addition to the CASPA fee, in order to process your application, you will also need to submit a non-refundable supplemental fee of $45.
    GRE or MCAT:  GRE or MCAT must have been taken within 5 years of application to our program.
    Prerequisite Courses:

    Required Courses

    Credit Hours

    Comments
    Biology

    3–4

    Any biology course in addition to Anatomy, Physiology, Microbiology; must include lab
    Human or Vertebrate Anatomy

    3–4

    Must include lab
    Human or Vertebrate Physiology

    3–4

    Must include lab
    Microbiology

    3–4

    Must include lab
    Chemistry

    3–4

    Must include lab
    Organic Chemistry OR Biochemistry

    3–4

    Lab preferred
    Psychology

    6

    1 intro and 1 upper OR 2 upper level psychology courses; abnormal and developmental psychology are preferred.
    Statistics

    3

    Can be from biology, mathematics, psychology, or business. NOTE — if a psychology course is used to meet this requirement, it cannot also be used for the psychology requirement.
    Medical Terminology

    1–2

    A medical terminology certificate could be used to fulfill the prerequisite requirement for this coursework.

    GPA:  A minimum of 3.0 overall GPA required. We expect that most accepted students will surpass this minimum. In addition, all prerequisite courses must reflect a “C” or better.
    References:  Three references are required (submitted via CASPA).
    Observation Hours:  Health care observation hours or actual health care experiences are recommended but not required.
    Essay: The CASPA application form will require a brief personal essay.
    Interview: The Admissions Committee will send invitations to selected candidates to interview. Not all applicants will be invited to interview. An interview does not guarantee acceptance into the program.

    Before registering for classes, students must provide:

    • Criminal background checks (federal requirement for all persons working with vulnerable populations) at student expense
    • Signed Technical Standards document
    • Written verification of immunizations
    • Written verification of health insurance
    • Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Providers certification from the American Heart Association

    After classes start, and in preparation for clinical placements, students must also provide:

    • Any additional requirements as stated by specific health care agencies (such as drug screening, criminal background checks, etc.) at student expense


    Admission Decisions

    The Health Sciences Graduate Programs use multiple criteria to select the most promising candidates from an applicant pool which exceeds the number of seats available. Admission decisions are made by the Murphy Deming College of Health Sciences Admissions Committee after applications are completed, interview has been given, and committee reviews in the context of the applicant pool. The Director of Enrollment informs applicants in writing of their admission status. Applicants are advised at the time of their admission regarding any additional undergraduate course requirements that must be fulfilled as conditions of enrollment. Mary Baldwin College reserves the right to rescind admission for students whose criminal background check comes back positive for any conviction.

    Conditional Acceptance

    Admission “Conditional Acceptance” will be used for students finishing their prerequisite coursework. Their acceptance, through a written document, will be conditional pending confirmation that they have met all admissions requirements, including official transcript showing final coursework was completed; meeting GPA and minimum course grade requirements; and confirming that they have earned their baccalaureate degree, before enrollment into the program.

    Transfer Credit

    The graduate courses in health sciences are arranged in a lock-step sequence, and therefore we cannot accept graduate transfer credits. These courses may, however, be used to meet the prerequisite requirements. There is no waiver of course work or advanced standing granted in any program.

    Articulation Agreements

    Murphy Deming College of Health Sciences will have articulation agreements with a select group of institutions to provide early admittance to qualified students. Pursuant to these agreements, all admission requirements must be met prior to matriculation.

    Guaranteed Acceptance Program

    Murphy Deming College of Health Sciences encourages Mary Baldwin College undergraduate students to apply to its graduate programs. The Guaranteed Acceptance Program provides early conditional admission in their junior year. In order to apply under this program, students must meet all minimum requirements as outlined on our website, www.mbc.edu/health_sciences, and graduate with a bachelor’s degree.

    Advising

    Academic advisement is a process-oriented, interactive professional relationship between advisor and advisee. Each graduate student is assigned a faculty advisor who supports the student in career exploration, academic progress and performance related to professional standards and support for their final project.

  • Tuition and Fees 2014–2015

    Tuition for all graduate programs in health sciences is determined on an annual basis and billed per semester. Tuition is inclusive of all course, lab, and technology fees.

    Financial Aid

    Mary Baldwin makes every effort to assist students who need to obtain funding for education. Students should contact the Office of Financial Aid at the time of application. To apply for financial aid students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each year at www.fafsa.ed.gov. To qualify for aid, students must be accepted in the health sciences programs and make satisfactory academic progress in the work attempted. Aid is awarded pending approvals of federal and state agencies.

    Aid for Which Graduate Students May Qualify

    • Loans: Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loans; Grad PLUS Loans; Private Education Loans
    • Virginia residents are eligible for the Virginia Tuition Assistance Grant (VTAG)
    • Outside scholarships

     

  • Murphy Deming College of Health Sciences Academic Policies

    Academic policies applicable to health sciences graduate students are published in this catalog. Other program policies are provided to students in the MDCHS Student Handbook and the Clinical Education Manual. Policies may be amended at any time by the faculty, who determine the date at which amended policies become effective.

    Honor System

    The students, faculty, and administration of the Murphy Deming College of Health Sciences join together in support of the HONOR CODE for the purposes of (a) providing an atmosphere of mutual trust, concern, and respect; (b) fostering honorable and ethical behavior; and (c) cultivating lifelong professional conduct. To promote this purpose, matters regarding misconduct shall fall under the jurisdiction of the Honor Code (refer to MDCHS Student Handbook) while other aspects of a student’s graduate education will be covered by guidelines stated in this document as well as the MDCHS Student Handbook.

    Copyright Policy

    The college enforces all provisions of copyright law. Students are responsible to inform themselves of the law, particularly with respect to copying.

    Research on Human Subjects

    Federal, state, and college policies regarding research on human subjects apply to all research involving MBC students, faculty, or staff as researchers or as subjects, including research undertaken in the health sciences programs.

    Grading, Student Standing, and Academic Probation

    The health sciences graduate programs are all full-time programs. Students will not be permitted to reduce the course load in a semester as the professional programs are sequential and require the student to complete them in a specific period of time. Any special circumstances related to course work for students will be addressed on a case-by-case basis with the Learning Skills Center professional, the program director, and the faculty.

    The following grading scale will be used by all programs in the Murphy Deming College of Health Sciences:

    90–100% A 4.0 points per semester hour
    80–89% B 3.0 points per semester hour
    70–79% C 2.0 points per semester hour
    60–69% D(1)  1.0 point per semester hour
    <60% F(1) 0.0
    I Incomplete (used for extenuating circumstances)
    IP In progress
    P(2) Passing (used only in Pass/Fail Grading Status)
    W Withdraw

    (1) Does not count toward graduate degree requirement, does count on grade point average.
    (2) Does count toward graduate degree: does not count on grade point average.                         

    Graduate courses will be taken in semesters and assigned appropriate credit hours for contact time for lecture, lab, and clinical activities as appropriate. A course may be offered as a pass/fail grading option; however, students may not choose to take a regular, graded course for pass/fail.

    All graduate courses in the college must be passed with a grade of “C” or better. A student receiving a grade of “D” or “F” in any course will be dismissed from the program in which they are enrolled. Students must maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 or better to continue in the program and graduate. Students falling below a GPA of 3.0 in any given semester will be placed on academic probation. A student may remain on academic probation for one additional semester in order to reach a 3.0 overall GPA. If the 3.0 GPA is not met at that time the student will be dismissed from the program.

    A student on probation at the completion of the first spring semester academic year may be permitted to proceed to Clinical Education 1 or Field Work 1 if the student has completed all course work with no grade lower than a “C,” has successfully passed all practical examinations, and has demonstrated appropriate professional behaviors in class and clinical settings. Faculty will meet to discuss the student’s performance and determine the student’s readiness to proceed to the full-time clinical experience.

    If a student is permitted to proceed to Clinical Education 1 and successfully completes it, the student will then have one full-time semester (9 credit hours or more) in which to improve their GPA to a 3.0 or better.

    Students must be at a 3.0 GPA or better at the completion of the second spring academic semester in order to proceed to Clinical Education 2 or Fieldwork 2. Students must also be at a 3.0 or better in order to proceed to the terminal clinical internship experiences for the third year, and must maintain the 3.0 GPA in order to graduate.

    For students in the PA Program: Students who fail to maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 at the conclusion of the final didactic semester will be subject to academic review by the appropriate faculty committee. The student may face consequences which could include remediation, inability to progress to the clinical phase, or dismissal from the program. Academic probation during the clinical phase of the program is addressed more completely in the Clinical Education Manual.

    Students on academic probation should meet with their faculty advisor and course instructors on a regular basis to facilitate their academic improvement.

    Students on academic probation are not eligible for academic and programmatic merit awards.

    Incompletes

    A grade of “I” (for incomplete) may be given at the end of a course if, for reasons beyond the student’s control, the student is unable to complete the work. An incomplete is given upon the recommendation of the course instructor and the approval of the program director and vice president for health sciences. In order to receive an “I” students must have achieved a passing grade to date in the class. Work must be completed by the end of the next semester and the student cannot matriculate to the next phase of professional study until the incomplete has been resolved successfully resulting in the assigning of a passing grade for the course. If the work is not completed within the time specified when the incomplete was granted, or within the explicitly authorized extended time, a permanent “I” grade will be recorded and the course will need to be repeated.

    In Progress (IP)

    An in progress grade can be given for practicum courses only. The IP is used in the event there is a delay in completing the clinical assignment (not attributable to the student) by the time grades are due.

    In the event that a student does not successfully complete the doctoral project or practicum in time for graduation, the student must enroll in a “Continuing Credit” course in order to complete the program.

    Program Matriculation and Completion — DPT and OTD Programs

    At the end of each semester faculty review the academic performance of all students. In order to matriculate to the next semester students must successfully complete all courses in a particular semester with a grade of “C” or better and maintain a 3.0 GPA. All practical testing during that semester must be passed. The student must demonstrate appropriate professional behaviors as expected in all courses. The student will be permitted to progress to the second professional year and beyond only if all course work and full-time clinical experiences have been successfully completed. Comprehensive examinations will be completed at the end of the second professional year for some graduate programs. These must be successfully completed before matriculation to the full-time terminal clinical internship experiences in the final professional year. Successful completion and meeting of entry-level competencies is required in the full-time terminal clinical internship experiences in order to graduate as scheduled. If a student fails a clinical internship experience he/she may be offered the opportunity to repeat the clinical internship. These specific procedures are further outlined in the Clinical Education Manual which students will receive and review prior to clinical placement.

    Program Matriculation and Completion – PA Program

    At the end of each semester faculty review the academic performance of all students. In order to matriculate to the next semester students must successfully complete all courses in a particular semester with a grade of “C” or better and maintain a 3.0 GPA. All practical testing during that semester must be passed. The student must demonstrate appropriate professional behaviors as expected in all courses. To enter the clinical phase, a student must successfully complete all didactic courses and clinical assignments, successfully complete the core competency examinations and objective standardized clinical examinations (OSCE) given following completion of the didactic phase of the program as well as maintain standards of professional behavior. In addition to successful completion of the didactic year, the student must be certified in basic life support for health care providers (BLS), advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) and pediatric advanced life support (PALS). Students must maintain CPR/ACLS/PALS certification for the entire clinical year of the program. In the event the student’s certification in CPR/ACLS/PALS expires before graduation, the student must recertify.

     

    Academic Resolutions and Appeals

    Academic Action Appeal Policy and Procedures

    The college recognizes the need for students to voice grievances and to seek resolution to problems, disagreements with faculty/administrators, or interpretations of institutional policy.  The college also recognizes the responsibility of the student to express their concerns in a professional and ethical manner. Concerns may involve course grades, promotion, behavioral issues, or issues related to accreditation standards and procedures.

    A student may only appeal a final grade or program dismissal if he/she can show the grade or program dismissal was assigned arbitrarily or impermissibly. A student who wishes to appeal a grade on a particular assignment or exam can do so if it affects their final assigned grade or dismissal from a program. A final grade or program dismissal is deemed to have been assigned arbitrarily or impermissibly if, by a preponderance of the evidence, a student establishes that:

    1. The final grade or dismissal was impermissible based in whole or in part upon the student’s race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, disability, sexual orientation, or for some other arbitrary or personal reason unrelated to the instructor’s reasonable exercise of his or her professional academic judgment in the evaluation of the academic performance of the student; or
    2. The final grade or program dismissal was assigned in a manner not consistent with the standards and procedures for evaluation established by the instructor, the program, or the college in the MDCHS Student Handbook, in the course syllabus, or during the class/program in written or oral communications directed to the class/program as a whole; or
    3. The final grade or program dismissal was the result of a clear and material mistake in calculating or recording grades or other evaluation.
    4. Individual elements (e.g., assignments, tests, activities, projects) which contribute to a final grade are generally NOT subject to appeal or subsequent review during a final grade appeals procedure. However, individual elements may be appealed under these procedures providing all of the following conditions are met:

    a) The student presents compelling evidence that one or more individual elements were graded on arbitrary or impermissible grounds;

    b) Grounds can be established for determining a professionally sound grade for the appealed element(s); and

    c) The ensuing grade for each appealed element would have resulted in a different course grade than that assigned by the faculty member.

    If dismissal from MDCHS is a result of grades, the student may appeal the grade causing the dismissal. If the appeal is unsuccessful, the dismissal stands; the student cannot appeal the dismissal as well as the grade because dismissal is based upon the grades. If the appeal is successful, the dismissal will be rescinded. If a student is appealing dismissal from a program, or a final assigned grade that results in dismissal, the student shall be allowed to continue taking courses until the appeal is resolved (with the approval of the program in which the classes are taken), with the exception of clinical placements or internships, or when the student’s continued participation is deemed by the program director or department head to be harmful or disruptive to other students and/or the program. If the appeal is unsuccessful and the dismissal stands, the student will be removed from any classes in which he or she is registered and will be responsible for any tuition and fees accrued as a result of registration during the appeals process.

    Final Grade Appeal Procedures

    The following procedures detail the steps for appealing a final assigned grade (whether or not that grade results in dismissal from MDCHS). The student is encouraged to meet/talk with the instructor prior to filing a formal appeal. The student must demonstrate that the grade was impermissibly or arbitrarily assigned. That the student simply disagrees with the assigned grade does not constitute a basis for a review.

    I. Appeal to Instructor
    Within twenty (20) calendar days after the student receives notification of the academic action (grade) the student should submit a formal written appeal to the instructor. This appeal must include:

    • A statement of the reason(s) why the student believes the grade was impermissibly or arbitrarily assigned (see Academic Action Appeal Policy and Procedures)
    • The resolution sought
    • All correspondence should include contact information.
    • The instructor must respond to the student’s request in writing as soon as possible (no later than ten working days after receiving the student’s written appeal). This response should detail whether or not the instructor is approving or denying the appeal.

    II. Appeal to Program Director
    If the student is unable to resolve the grievance through the appeal to the instructor, the student should submit a written appeal to the program director within ten working days of receiving the instructor’s written response (from Step I). Students appealing to the program director assume the burden of proof. Therefore, the appeal must include:

    • A statement of the reason(s) the student believes the grade was impermissibly or arbitrarily assigned;
    • The steps taken to resolve the disagreement over the assigned course grade; and
    • The resolution sought.
    • The appeal must be accompanied by evidence the student believes supports the conclusion that the grade was impermissibly or arbitrarily assigned. Evidence might include papers, tests, syllabi, or written documentation.

    Within ten working days of receiving this appeal, the program director will attempt to resolve the appeal. If the program director is unable to resolve the appeal within ten working days, the program director will notify the student of the decision and copy the VPHS.

    III. Appeal to the VPHS Office

    Student should forward his/her initial Appeal to the Instructor and the response from the instructor (from Step I), the subsequent Appeal to the program director, and the program director’s written notification (from Step II) to the VPHS Office. Upon receipt of the appeal and aforementioned materials the vice president will identify a faculty member (VPHS special designee) outside of the student’s program or assistant or associate dean, to review the information, request further information from the student, the instructor, and/or the program director. If the VPHS designee concludes that the facts alleged by the student does not constitute permissible grounds for appeal as set forth in this Academic Action Appeal Policy and Procedures, the VPHS special designee may, in consultation with the VPHS dismiss the review. The student will not be allowed any further appeal. If the VPHS special designee determines that the facts alleged in the student’s written appeals could, if true, constitute a violation of the Academic Action Appeal Policy and Procedures, the VPHS special designee within ten working days of receiving all information, shall refer the case to the College Academic Action Committee.

    IV. College Academic Action Committee Review

    The College Academic Action Committee (CAAC) will consist of 3 faculty members (who do not teach in the program from which the appeal originated) and 2 students who are in different graduate programs appointed by the VPHS. The VPHS special designee will serve as ex-officio (non-voting) chair of this committee. The purpose of the CAAC is to determine whether the facts support the student’s contention that the grade was impermissibly or arbitrarily assigned, or there was material procedural deviation, as defined in the policy. It is not the function of the committee to re-evaluate the student’s work to determine whether the CAAC agrees with the professional judgment of the faculty member who assigned the grade.

    The committee shall be convened no later than ten working days from the time the request was made to the VPHS office by the student. All relevant documents collected by the VPHS special designee will be shared with committee members. Additionally, the CAAC may request oral presentations from both parties. Other relevant parties may be questioned.

    Neither the student nor the faculty member may be accompanied or represented in the hearing by legal counsel or other advisor. The CAAC may consider only such evidence as is offered by the parties and at the hearing(s) and need consider only the evidence offered that it considers fair and reliable. The burden of proof shall be on the student to satisfy the committee that a preponderance of the evidence supports a conclusion that the grade was awarded arbitrarily or impermissibly as defined. All recommendations of the CAAC shall be made by a simple majority vote.

    Within ten working days from the conclusion of its hearing(s) on the matter, the CAAC Chair will provide a written report to the VPHS. The committee report must include the committee’s finding as to whether or not the grade assigned was awarded arbitrarily or impermissibly as defined in the policy. If such a determination is made, the CAAC shall recommend a course of action which could include recommending assignment of a specific grade to replace the one originally assigned or implementation of some process to re-evaluate the student’s work.

    V. Review by the Vice President of Health Sciences
    Within ten working days after receiving the CAAC’s report, recommendations and other documentation assembled in the review, the VPHS will, in consultation with the faculty member and program director, determine a final course of action. S/he will then communicate the final action in writing to the student, faculty member, and program director within ten working days. No appeal is available beyond this review.

    Addressing Unprofessional Behavior

    Students are expected to demonstrate professional behavior at all times in the classroom, lab, and clinical setting (refer to Appendix A in the MDCHS Student Handbook). Students are expected to treat all individuals (students, faculty, patient, clinicians, etc.) with respect at all times. Unprofessional behaviors in any setting will be brought to the student’s attention by academic and clinical faculty. The student will be expected to correct any unprofessional behavior immediately upon receiving feedback about this behavior. Students that demonstrate a pattern of unprofessional behavior in any combination of settings will receive more formal counseling and behavior will be documented. That student may be dismissed if patterns of unacceptable professional behaviors persist despite counseling for improvement. The student must understand and model the characteristics defined by their professions.The faculty expects that students comply with these professional behavior expectations at all times (i.e. classroom, laboratory, meetings with faculty, program sponsored service activities, and clinical settings). The faculty believes that prompt remediation of actions, attitudes, or characteristics that demonstrate a student’s failure to comply with the expected professional behaviors is essential to facilitate successful completion of a program.

    As such, potential action that may be taken if a student does not comply with the Professional Behavior as outlined in the MDCHS Student Handbook. Please note that, depending on the severity of the specific violation, the faculty may initiate remediation and sanction procedures at any of the four steps described below (skip verbal warning and initiate a written warning, etc.) In addition, all remediation and sanction procedures will be documented and discussed with the student. The student will be asked to sign this documentation following discussion with a faculty member or the program director. Their signature indicates the issue has been discussed with them, not that he/she agrees with the nature of the allegations. This documentation will become part of the student’s permanent scholastic record within the program. As such, this information may be shared with potential employers if the student asks a faculty member to serve as a reference.

    Remediation and Sanction Procedures:

    1. Verbal Warning — to the student by the involved faculty member or advisor emphasizing the need to discontinue the behavior that is inconsistent with professional expectations. Documentation will note that a verbal warning has taken place and briefly describe the behavior violation.
    2. Written Warningfrom the program director to the student indicating the need to discontinue the behavior that is inconsistent with the expected professional behaviors. This letter will contain a detailed description of the nature of the unsatisfactory performance, parties who observed or were affected by the behavior, actions needed to correct the behavior, a timeline for correction, and actions to be taken if the problem is not corrected by the timeline expected, and notification that the student has a right to request a review of this action.
    3. Probation Periodfor the student during which time the faculty will assess the student’s ability to demonstrate expected professional behaviors. Probation is a time-limited, remediation-oriented period that is closely supervised by the program director. Students placed on probation for professional behaviors will be notified in writing of the following:

    a. The specific inappropriate behavior(s);
    b. The recommendations for rectifying this/these behaviors;
    c. The time frame for probation during which the behavior(s) is expected to be corrected; and
    d. The procedures to ascertain whether the behavior(s) has been rectified.

    If the program director determines that there has not been sufficient improvement in the student’s behavior to remove him/her from probation, then the director will discuss this with the faculty to determine possible courses of action. The director will communicate in writing to the student that the conditions for revoking probation have not been met. The notice will include the course of action determined by the faculty.

    1. Dismissal from the Program for Behavior(s) Inconsistent with the Expected Professional Behaviors: When the specific interventions do not result in the expected changes in behavior within the determined timeframe, or when a single violation of the expected professional behaviors is severe, the program director will discuss this with the VP of health sciences and involved faculty to determine if dismissal from the program is warranted. Dismissal will be invoked when in the faculty’s collective judgment:

    a. Technical standards have been violated;
    b. Severe violations of the college and profession Code of Ethics have taken place;
    c. Imminent physical or psychological harm to a fellow student, patient, instructor, or other individual is a major factor; or
    d. A pattern of behavior inconsistent with the expected professional behaviors is documented regardless of the students’ performance on written, oral, or practical assignments and courses.

    If the student disagrees with the faculty’s decision, he/she has the right to implement Appeal Procedures as described in the MDCHS Student Handbook.

    Program Dismissal Appeal Procedures

    The following procedures detail the steps for appealing a dismissal from a program for any reason other than final assigned grade(s), including failure to adhere to technical standards. Dismissal from the program based on bad grades may not be appealed. Program dismissals for any reason other than final assigned grades rest with the faculty of the program. The student is encouraged to meet/talk with the program director prior to filing a formal appeal. The student must demonstrate that dismissal was impermissibly or arbitrarily assigned. That the student simply disagrees with the dismissal does not constitute a basis for a review.

    I. Appeal to Program Director
    Within twenty calendar days after the student receives notification of the academic action (cause for program dismissal) the student should submit a formal written appeal to the program director. This appeal must include:

    • A statement of the reason(s) why the student believes the dismissal was impermissibly or arbitrarily assigned (see Academic Action Appeal Policy)
    • The resolution sought
    • All correspondence should include contact information.
    • The program director must respond to the student’s request in writing as soon as possible (no later than ten working days after receiving the student’s written appeal). This response should detail whether or not the program is approving or denying the appeal.

    II. Appeal to the Vice President of Health Sciences (VPHS)
    If the student is unable to resolve the grievance through the appeal to the program director, the student should submit a written appeal to the vice president of health sciences within ten working days of receiving the program director’s written response (from Step I). Students appealing to the VPHS assume the burden of proof. This is the last step in the appeal process. Therefore, the appeal must include:

    • A statement of the reason(s) the student believes the dismissal was impermissibly or arbitrarily assigned along with any evidence to support the statement
    • The steps taken to resolve the disagreement over the dismissal
    • The resolution sought
    • All correspondence should include contact information.

    The VPHS must respond to the student’s request in writing as soon as possible (no later than ten working days after receiving the student’s written appeal). This response should detail whether or not the appeal is approved or denied. This is the last step in the appeal process.

    Student Withdrawal

    Voluntary Academic Withdrawal

    A student who wishes to voluntarily withdraw from a program for financial, medical, or personal reasons should 1) talk with their faculty advisor, 2) talk to the program director, 3) provide a written letter to the program director stating his/her reasons for withdrawal, and 4) complete a Withdrawal Form, an exit interview, and an appointment with the Financial Aid and Business Offices. If a withdrawal is granted a refund is issued based on college policy less a $75 administration fee. Students will not be charged for subsequent semesters.

    Counseled Withdrawal

    A student may request and be granted a counseled withdrawal from the college. If, in the judgment of the vice president of health sciences, and the program director or designee, it is either in the student’s best interest or the best interest of the college, a student will be granted a counseled withdrawal. A Withdrawal Form, an exit interview, and an appointment with the Financial Aid and Business Offices are required. If a withdrawal is granted a refund is issued based on college policy less a $75 administration fee. Students will not be charged for subsequent semesters.

    Disciplinary Withdrawal

    Students may be required to withdraw from the college for disciplinary reasons, having been served a major penalty by the Honor Council or administration. Students who withdraw for disciplinary reasons receive a refund in accordance with college policy for the semester in which the penalty is determined, and subject to an administration fee of $75.

    Health Issues and Withdrawals or Leave of Absences

    Granting of a leave of absence is a rare and unusual event reserved only for exceptional circumstances. From time to time a student may develop a health-related problem that necessitates a medical leave of absence or withdrawal from the program and college. A student may be granted a medical leave of absence. If a student wishes to request a medical leave of absence he/she should meet with the program director first. Then the student would be required to provide documentation from a physician or other relevant health professional regarding the need for a medical leave. This will be provided to the MDCHS Vice President’s Office for evaluation by Health Services. To return to the program after a medical leave the student would be required to provide written documentation from a physician or other relevant health professional that he/she is mentally and/or physically able to return to classes. Because of the physical and mental nature of the health sciences programs the student will be required to have a completed “Participation Readiness Form,” as this documentation ensures that the student can meet the physical and mental demands of the program in which he or she is enrolled. The student should work with the program director to address sequencing of course work and the appropriate returning date to allow for a smooth transition back into the program. (See Appendix B of MDCHS Student Handbook)

    A student that withdraws from a program secondary to medical issues is welcome to reapply for admission through a regular admissions cycle at a later time.

    PA Program: Leaves will only be granted following successful completion of the didactic phase of the program, and will not be granted to students on academic probation. Requests for a leave of absence must be submitted in writing to the PA program director and should indicate the reason for the leave and expected duration. The director, in consultation with the VPHS, may approve such a request if the student is in good standing and is maintaining the equivalent of a grade of “C” in each course in progress at the time of the request. 

    Military Withdrawal

    Military withdrawal is granted to students whose military reserve obligations may require a period of absence from the academic program when they are called to extended active duty. Readmission is guaranteed pending proof of compliance with the minimal technical standards and the Honor Code of Conduct. The student will need to meet with the specific program director and VPHS to determine appropriate curriculum to be completed in the remainder of the degree program.

    Suspension

    Suspension is defined as a temporary separation from the institution. The duration of the suspension will be determined by the VPHS. Students may be assigned independent studies during suspension to remain current; however, these independent studies do not replace course attendance or rotation requirements. If the terms set out under the suspension are not fulfilled and the period of the suspension is six months or greater, the student will be dismissed from MDCHS.  The VPHS may grant an exception for extreme circumstances that are beyond the control of the student.

  • Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD)

    Nathan “Ben” Herz, program director; Allison Ellington, director of clinical education; Lisa Burns, faculty

    Overview

    The Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD) is a post-baccalaureate, entry-level professional doctoral degree that will prepare the student for work in any practice setting following graduation and licensure acquisition. The curriculum integrates the occupational therapy profession’s foundational knowledge requirements, its basic theoretical tenets and perspectives, and a strong didactic and clinical education focus to support students in achieving competencies in screening, evaluation, fabrication, and delivery of evidence-based plans of care. The curriculum is deliberately intended to incorporate the contexts associated with occupational therapy service delivery and will have an emphasis on interprofessional education in class and lab settings. Interprofessional activities will extend to opportunities for service to the local and regional community.

    The OTD student must successfully complete each didactic year prior to matriculation to the clinical education course that follows. The total length of the program will be 112 credit hours, 3.0 years (nine semesters) at the completion of the curricular process. The curriculum will include two, 12-week fieldwork experiences and one, 16-week Doctoral Experience. Students must successfully complete a practical examination at the completion of their second year in order to begin Fieldwork II practicum. They must also take and pass a written Department Exit Exam prior to matriculation to the final clinical experience (16 weeks). Successful completion of the terminal clinical practicum sequence and evidence of meeting the competencies for entry-level occupational therapy practice must be met in order to graduate.

    Mission of the Occupational Therapy Program

    The mission of the MDCHS OT department is to apply strong teaching and learning methodologies that will build upon each student’s diverse background in preparing them to deliver compassionate practice through an interprofessional team, with strong leadership skills, and the highest ethical standards for evidenced based client centered care that will increase engagement in meaningful productive living.

    Curriculum

    Summer Semester, Year 1:
    OTH 705 Introduction to Occupational Therapy
    OTH 711 Teaching and Learning 1
    OTH 700 Human Anatomy

    Fall Semester, Year 1:
    OTH 706 Foundations of Occupational Therapy
    OTH 701 Kinesiology
    OTH 712 Psycho-social Aspects of Care
    OTH 721 Research and Critical Inquiry
    OTH 726 Occupational Patterns in Life and Culture
    OTH 714 Managing OT Delivery Systems
    OTH 736 Clinical Fieldwork 1A (Introductory)

    Spring Semester, Year 1:
    OTH 704 Neuroanatomy
    OTH 727 OT Practice in Mental Health
    OTH 729 Motor Learning & Movement Analysis
    OTH 703 Pathophysiology
    OTH 713 Topics in Health Care
    OTH 730 Clinical Seminar 1
    OTH 737 Clinical Fieldwork 1B (Mental Health)

    Summer Semester, Year 2:
    OTH 827 Physical Agent Modalities
    OTH 826 OT and Adult Populations 1 (UE conditions and OT Practice)
    OTH 832 Technology and Environmental Adaptation
    OTH 811 Teaching and Learning 2

    Fall Semester, Year 2:
    OTH 828 OT and Adult Populations 2
    OTH 813 Teaching and Learning 3
    OTH 812 Community Practicum (Fall or Spring)
    OTH 831 Contemporary Assessment and Intervention
    OTH 830 Clinical Seminar 2
    OTH 822 Doctoral Project 1
    OTH 842 Clinical Fieldwork 1C (Adult)

    Spring Semester Year 2:
    OTH 829 Pediatric Practice in Occupational Therapy
    OTH 814 Organization and Management of Practice
    OTH 815 Leadership, Policy, and Advocacy
    OTH 840 Clinical Seminar 3
    OTH 823 Doctoral Project 2
    OTH 812 Community Practicum (Fall or Spring)
    OTH 843 Clinical Fieldwork 1D (Pediatrics)

    Summer Semester, Year 3:
    OTH 845 Clinical Fieldwork 2A (12 weeks)
    OTH 921 Doctoral Project 3

    Fall Semester, Year 3:
    OTH 855 Clinical Fieldwork 2B (12 weeks)
    OTH 835 Professional Competency

    Spring Semester, Year 3:
    OTH 865 Doctoral Experience (16 weeks)
    OTH 922 Doctoral Project 4

    TOTAL CREDITS = 112

    Occupational Therapy (OTH) Course Descriptions

    Contact the OT Program Office for specific syllabi

    OTH 700 Human Anatomy(5 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. This course provides in depth study and analysis of the regional and systemic organization of the human body through lecture and cadaver dissection. This course is cross listed with PTH 700 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 701 Kinesiology (3 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. This course will introduce the student to the kinematics and kinetics of human movement. Emphasis will be placed on understanding of regional functional anatomy and applying this information to movement. This course is cross listed with PTH 701 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 703 Pathophysiology (3 s.h.)
    This course will cover the pathological processes related to the immune system, and neoplasia in general. An overview of the most clinically significant diseases for the various body systems including a description of causes, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestations for the health care professional will be covered. This course is cross listed with PTH 703 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 704 Neuroanatomy (3 s.h.)
    The course includes the study of functional neuroanatomy and neuroscience to understand the basic structure and function of the nervous system with special emphasis on topics of greatest concern to occupational and physical therapists. This course is cross listed with PTH 704 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 705 Introduction to Occupational Therapy(1 s.h.)
    This course will allow students to gain a foundational knowledge and skills of occupation related to the history of the profession, current health care trends, and the various setting for OT practice.

    OTH 706 Foundations of Occupational Therapy(3 s.h.)
    In this course the student will examine the critical reasoning behind the service provision for clients with whom they work. Developing OT critical reasoning includes: screening and identification of problems to support students in referral, assessment, goal setting, intervention planning, reassessment, discontinuation for client, and family-centered care. Included will be applications of theory in various settings in order to utilize evidenced-based practice.

    OTH 711 Teaching and Learning 1(1 s.h.)
    The course provides an understanding of teaching and learning theories with application to clinical practice for occupational and physical therapy. This course is cross listed with PTH 711 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 712 Psycho-social Aspects of Care (2 s.h.)
    This course will introduce the students to various psychosocial considerations important to working with patients and clients successfully. This course is cross listed with PTH 712 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 713 Topics in Health Care (2 s.h.)
    This course will provide the student an overview of key topics in health care that are important for health professionals to understand. Topics will include an introduction to health care systems organization, health care financing, Medicare, Medicaid, and managed care. This course is cross listed with PTH 713 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 714 Managing OT Delivery Systems (2 s.h.)
    The course will provide a general examination of the delivery systems associated with rehabilitation and focus on specific environments and structures.

    OTH 721 Research and Critical Inquiry (2 s.h.)
    This course covers concepts and principles of the research process including question, theory, and hypothesis development, research design and methodology, and statistical reasoning and analysis. Critical review of professional literature and determination of the relevance and applicability of research findings to specific patient problems are introduced with the goal of promoting evidence-based practice in health care. This course is cross listed with PTH 721 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 722 Special Topics (variable s.h.)
    Exploration of current special topics in occupational therapy ex­amination and intervention.

    OTH 723 Continuing Registration for Final Project (1 s.h.)
    Non-credit course intended for students who have completed all program credits but still need to use university resources to complete their degree requirements.

    OTH 724 Independent Study (variable s.h.)
    Independent study in interdisciplinary or discipline specific issues and/or clinical practice with goals, methods, and expected outcomes negotiated in advance with an individual faculty member.

    OTH 725 Perspectives in Global Health Care (1–2 s.h., variable)
    Elective Course. This course provides an exploration of global health care issues with a travel opportunity. Students will participate in service and/or clinical activities as part of the course.

    OTH 726 Occupational Patterns in Life and Culture(3 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. This course analyzes developmental theories and occupations across the lifespan (from birth to death). Emphasis is placed on the analysis and synthesis of interrelationships of occupation and development as well as specific physical decline with age. The influence of cultural diversity and the environment across the lifespan are also analyzed.

    OTH 727 OT Practice in Mental Health (3 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. In this course students will utilize critical reasoning and selected theories, evaluation, and intervention approaches for mental health practice. Principles of health promotion, occupationally-based intervention models, and the application of selected individual and/or group programming within specific health and community based settings will be reviewed.

    OTH 729 Motor Learning and Movement Analysis (3 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. In this course students will understand, analyze, and implement integration of motor control and motor learning approaches related to occupational therapy interventions including the analysis of posture, balance, quality of movement, and the impact on occupational performance. Current evidence is used to update the knowledge of selected methodologies for assessment and intervention related to movement analysis, health and wellness principles, and specific impairments related to adult health conditions (including older adults).

    OTH 730 Clinical Seminar 1 (1 s.h.)
    This is the first course in a sequence that utilizes a case-based learning model to integrate clinical management of common patient diagnoses across the professional disciplines of physical therapy and occupational therapy. This course is cross listed with PTH 730 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 736 Clinical Fieldwork 1A (Introductory) (1 s.h.)
    In this course the student will apply the knowledge and skills learned in the first two semesters of graduate OT coursework. Various practice settings are utilized to expose the student to the role of an OT as an interdisciplinary team member, the uses of OT theory and frames of references, as well as the role of the OTA and other disciplines. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis.

    OTH 737 Clinical Fieldwork 1B (Mental Health)(1 s.h.)
    The course will address the OT role in the mental health care setting to include but not be limited to acute psychiatry, community based mental health, hospital, or Geri-psych facilities. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis.

    OTH 811 Teaching and Learning 2 (1 s.h.)
    The course provides an understanding of teaching and learning theories with application to clinical practice for occupational and physical therapy students. Students will examine the means by which one successfully implements teaching and evaluates learning in a clinical setting. This course is cross listed with PTH 811 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 812 Community Practicum(2 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. Occupational therapy and physical therapy students, working in teams with local community agencies, will develop a requested service project that is health related. An interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 813 Teaching and Learning 3(2 s.h.)
    In this course students will formulate appropriate learning goals then plan learning activities to engage students in ways that will achieve those goals. Each student will be responsible for teaching a specific subject area associated with Occupational Therapy practice and will have the opportunity to be evaluated and receive feedback on their efforts.

    OTH 814 Organization and Management of Practice (3 s.h.)
    This course includes an application of administrative and professional leadership processes, standards of practice, competencies, needs assessments, program development, outcome management, reimbursement, ethics, policy, and trends in OT practice.

    OTH 815 Leadership, Policy, and Advocacy(2 s.h.)
    In this course students will review the literature regarding leadership and examine their own leadership style. Federal and state legislation will also be critically analyzed and discussed relevant to its impact on those in the rehabilitation professions and on the clients they serve. Students will be exposed to advocacy activities that will provide them with opportunities to gain knowledge of specific societal needs.

    OTH 822 Doctoral Project 1 (2 s.h.)
    This course is the first in a sequence that leads to the completion of a culminating project for the OTD curriculum. The course will include review of content from Research and Critical Inquiry with a focus on formulating an appropriate research or project question. This course is cross listed with PTH 822 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 823 Doctoral Project 2(2 s.h.)
    This course is the second in a sequence that leads to the completion of a culminating project for the OTD curriculum. Students will select an area of concentration from clinical practice, research, education, service, or advocacy. The student will work with a faculty advisor to develop and plan a project that will be presented at the completion of the third year prior to graduation. This course is cross listed with PTH 823 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 826 OT and Adult Populations 1 (UE conditions and OT Practice) (3 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. The course will introduce the area of upper extremity function and dysfunction. The course will examine musculoskeletal disorders to include fractures, nerve compressions, and injuries to the shoulder, wrist, and hand. The use of appropriate assessments and interventions for impairments, illnesses, or injuries related to adult health conditions (including older adults) are addressed.

    OTH 827 Physical Agent Modalities (2 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. In this course the student will understand the use of physical agent modalities as an intervention and adjunctive therapy. Assessment (implications/contra-indications), implementation, and discontinuance of specific modalities will be addressed.

    OTH 828 OT and Adult Populations 2 (3 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. This course will address occupationally-based theories and evidenced-based approaches for the selection and application of family and client-centered care for adult populations. Focus would include but not be limited to spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injuries, cerebral vascular accidents, and degenerative disease processes.

    OTH 829 Pediatric Practice in Occupational Therapy (4 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. This course will address the selection and application of appropriate assessments and interventions for the pediatric client population. Emphasis will be on analyzing atypical development, understanding the various roles of the occupational therapist with this population and specific pediatric approaches. Techniques for collaboration and advocacy within interdisciplinary teams will be discussed.

    OTH 830 Clinical Seminar 2 (1 s.h.)
    This is the second in a sequence of courses that utilizes a case-based learning model to integrate clinical management of common patient diagnoses across the professional disciplines of physical therapy and occupational therapy. The focus will be on interprofessional understanding and collaboration in a patient-centered health care delivery model. This course is cross listed with PTH 830 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 831 Contemporary Assessment and Intervention (3 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. In this course students will examine specific assessment and interventions associated with contemporary needs such as low vision, driving, obesity, ergonomics, tele-health, assisted living, building and construction design, and aging in place.

    OTH 832 Technology and Environmental Adaptation(3 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. The course guides the student through the design, development, modifications, compensation, and adaptations of personal needs and the environment, as it relates to occupational roles and context.

    OTH 835 Professional Competency(1 s.h.)
    This course is a self-paced application of program learning in preparation for the Department Exit Exam (DEE) and the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). The course uses critical analyses of professional entry competencies for the occupational therapist including certification, licensure, and professional development responsibilities. A programmatic review and professional self-assessment are conducted.

    OTH 840 Clinical Seminar 3 (1 s.h.)
    This course is the third and final in a sequence of courses that utilize a case-based learning model to integrate clinical management of common patient diagnoses across the professional disciplines of physical therapy and occupational therapy. Cases in this course will focus on complex medical management. This course is cross listed with PTH 840 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 842 Clinical Fieldwork 1C (Adult)(1 s.h.)
    Students will be placed in physical disabilities setting (adult and geriatrics) to include but not be limited to: long-term care, acute, out-patient, and in-patient rehabilitation. Level I experiences are designed to integrate fieldwork seminars with clinical experiences in order to strengthen the ties between didactic and practical instruction. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis.

    OTH 843 Clinical Fieldwork 1D (Pediatrics)(1 s.h.)
    Students will be placed in a pediatric setting, to include but not be limited to: out-patient, schools, and children’s medical centers (acute or rehabilitation). All Level I experiences are designed to provide fieldwork seminars and experiences to strengthen the ties between the didactic and fieldwork education. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis.

    OTH 845 Clinical Fieldwork 2A (12 weeks)(10 s.h.)
    This course is an intensive practicum to address the development of competent, entry-level, generalist knowledge and skills related to OT service provision. This fieldwork experience will focus on the application of purposeful and meaningful occupation and may include research, administration, and management of occupational services. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis.

    OTH 855 Clinical Fieldwork 2B (12 weeks)(10 s.h.)
    This course is an intensive practicum to address the development of competent, entry-level, generalist knowledge and skills related to OT service provision. This fieldwork experience will focus on the application of purposeful and meaningful occupation and may include research, administration, and management of occupational services. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis.

    OTH 865 Doctoral Experience (16 weeks) (13 s.h.)
    This is the culminating practical experience in the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program. This experiential placement will be made consistent with the interest of the student, under the guidance of an external mentor and faculty advisor. The experience creates and enhances the student’s professional skills and abilities allowing them to acquire advance knowledge in one or more areas of the profession. Examples are: legislation and policy, clinical practice, advocacy, leadership, research, program development, administration, education, or theory development. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis.

    OTH 921 Doctoral Project 3 (1 s.h.)
    This course is the third in a sequence that leads to the completion of a culminating project in the OTD curriculum. The focus of this course is to prepare to implement the proposed project/research. This course is cross listed with PTH 921 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    OTH 922 Doctoral Project 4 (1 s.h.)
    This is the final course in a sequence that leads to the completion of a culminating project for the OTD curriculum. The student will present the final project via a poster or platform exhibition during Doctoral Project Week prior to graduation. This course is cross listed with PTH 922 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

  • Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)

    Lisa D. Shoaf, program director; V. Kai Kennedy, director of clinical education; Keith Bishop, faculty; Bess Maxwell, faculty

    Overview

    The doctor of physical therapy (DPT) program will prepare the student as an entry-level physical therapist who can work in any practice setting upon graduation and licensure. The DPT program will focus on developing the important skills of critical thinking, and application of evidence-based practice, for optimizing patient outcomes within the context of compassionate care delivery. Murphy Deming College of Health Sciences will have an emphasis on interprofessional education. Students from various health professions will work collaboratively in class and lab settings. Interprofessional activities will also extend to opportunities for service to local and regional communities.

    The DPT is a post baccalaureate entry-level professional doctoral degree. Applicants must have completed a bachelor’s degree prior to matriculation into the program. Students will be required to complete a full-time curriculum over slightly more than three years (nine semesters). The DPT student must successfully complete each didactic year prior to matriculation to the clinical education course that follows. Students will complete two shorter full-time clinical experiences during the program at the completion of the first and second years of didactic course work to help integrate course content into the clinical setting. Two longer clinical experiences of 16 weeks each will be completed during the final year of the program leading to achievement of entry-level practice skills. Students will complete clinical experiences in outpatient orthopedics and in a setting treating medically ill and complex patients. There will be opportunities for specialty rotations such as pediatrics, sports medicine, manual therapy practice, neuro rehab, and aquatics. Successful completion of the terminal clinical practicum sequence and evidence of meeting the competencies for entry-level physical therapy practice must be met in order to graduate.

    Mission of the Physical Therapy Program

    The mission of the doctor of physical therapy program is to prepare individuals to be compassionate and ethical entry-level physical therapists that utilize critical thinking skills and evidence-based knowledge for decision making, and demonstrate strong interprofessional collaboration for patient-centered care that enhances function and decreases the influence of illness on society. Graduates will be lifelong learners that utilize contemporary practice models in a variety of practice settings across the lifespan.

    In realizing its mission, the doctor of physical therapy program at Murphy Deming College of Health Sciences is committed to serving the Commonwealth of Virginia, the nation, and beyond by:

    • Preparing health professionals who demonstrate the ability to respond effectively to an ever-changing global environment;
    • Conducting engaged scholarship through exploration and discovery of knowledge meaningful to teaching and health;
    • Providing a dynamic and student-centered teaching and learning environment that fosters interprofessional collaboration and the development of compassionate and ethical health professionals; and
    • Striving for excellence among students and faculty through community service, life-long learning, advocacy, and leadership with a focus on enhancing the well-being of the individual.

    Curriculum

    Summer Semester, Term II, Year 1:
    PTH 700  Human Anatomy
    PTH 714  Professional Issues 1
    PTH 711  Principles of Teaching and Learning 1

    Fall Semester, Year 1:
    PTH 706  Foundations of Clinical Exercise 1
    PTH 701  Kinesiology
    PTH 712  Psychosocial Aspects of Care
    PTH 705  Foundations of PT Practice
    PTH 702  Cellular Systems Physiology
    PTH 721  Research and Critical Inquiry

    Spring Semester, Year 1:
    PTH 707  Biomechanics
    PTH 703  Pathophysiology
    PTH 713  Topics in Health Care
    PTH 726  Musculoskeletal Management 1
    PTH 727  Therapeutic Agents
    PTH 704  Neuroanatomy
    PTH 730  Clinical Seminar 1

    Summer Semester, Term I, Year 1:
    PTH 740  Clinical Education 1

    Summer Semester, Term II, Year 2:
    PTH 826  Musculoskeletal Management 2
    PTH 801  Pharmacology
    PTH 802  Clinical Imaging
    PTH 811  Principles of Teaching and Learning 2

    Fall Semester, Year 2:
    PTH 827  Musculoskeletal Management 3
    PTH 813  Professional Issues 2
    PTH 828  Neuromuscular Management 1 — Adult
    PTH 803  Foundations of Clinical Exercise 2
    PTH 822  Doctoral Project 1
    PTH 812  Community Practicum  (Fall or Spring 2nd Year)
    PTH 830  Clinical Seminar 2 

    Spring Semester, Year 2:
    PTH 829  Neuromuscular Management  2 — Pediatrics
    PTH 831  Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Management
    PTH 832  Integumentary Management
    PTH 823  Doctoral Project 2
    PTH 833  Health Promotion and Wellness
    PTH 840  Clinical Seminar 3

    Summer Semester, Term I, Year 2:
    PTH 845  Clinical Education 2

    Summer Semester, Term II, Year 3:
    PTH 814  Administration and Organization of Practice Settings
    PTH 834  Specialty Practice Management
    PTH 815  Professional Issues 3
    PTH 835  Comprehensive Outcomes

    Fall Semester, Year 3:
    PTH 855  Clinical Education 3
    PTH 921  Doctoral Project 3

    Spring Semester, Year 3:
    PTH 865  Clinical Education 4
    PTH 922  Doctoral Project 4

    TOTAL HOURS = 124

    Physical Therapy (PTH) Course Descriptions

    Contact the PT Program Office for specific syllabi

    PTH 700 Human Anatomy (5 s.h.)
    This course provides in-depth study and analysis of the regional and systemic organization of the human body through lecture and cadaver dissection. This course is cross listed with OTH 700 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 701 Kinesiology (3 s.h.)
    Lecture and lab. This course will introduce the student to the kinematics and kinetics of human movement. Emphasis will be placed on understanding of regional functional anatomy and applying this information to analysis of movement. This course is cross listed with OTH 701 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 702 Cellular Systems Physiology (3 s.h.)
    This course is designed to present the important features of histology and embryology for cell and system function in the human, providing the foundation to study pathophysiological changes in cells and systems that lead to dysfunction from development to aging.

    PTH 703 Pathophysiology(3 s.h.)
    This course will cover the pathological processes related to the immune system, and neoplasia in general. An overview of the most clinically significant diseases for the various body systems including a description of causes, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestations for the health care professional will be covered. This course is cross listed with OTH 703 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 704 Neuroanatomy (3 s.h.)
    The course includes the study of functional neuroanatomy and neuroscience to understand the basic structure and function of the nervous system with special emphasis on topics of greatest concern to occupational and physical therapists. This course is cross listed with OTH 704 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 705 Foundations of PT Practice (3 s.h.)
    Lecture and lab. This course introduces the student to the foundations of practice that will build in other courses specific to a practice area. The student will be introduced to the clinical reasoning models that will be used throughout the program, as well as an introduction to the Guide to PT Practice. The basics of a systems screening will be introduced as well as beginning practice skills.

    PTH 706 Foundations of Clinical Exercise 1 (3 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. This course reviews key principles of exercise physiology as it pertains to various parameters of exercise. The student will examine physiological responses of apparently healthy individuals, as well as those individuals with disease and special needs with a focus on musculoskeletal and neuromuscular issues across the lifespan. This course will serve as a foundation for designing appropriate exercise programs for individuals with musculoskeletal issues and/or neuromuscular issues.

    PTH 707 Biomechanics (3 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. This course will continue to build on course content from Kinesiology further developing knowledge and understanding related to selected biomechanical factors influencing normal and pathological human form and movement including posture and gait analysis.

    PTH 711 Principles of Teaching and Learning 1(1 s.h.)
    The course provides an understanding of teaching and learning theories with application to clinical practice for occupational and physical therapy. This course is cross listed with OTH 711 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 712 Psychosocial Aspects of Care (3 s.h.)
    This course will introduce students to various psychosocial considerations important to working with patients and clients successfully including ethics, cultural considerations, and communication. This course is cross listed with OTH 712 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 713 Topics in Health Care(2 s.h.)
    This course will provide the student an overview of key topics in health care that are important for health professionals to understand. Topics will include an introduction to health care systems organization, health care financing, Medicare, Medicaid, managed care, and future trends in health care. This course is cross listed with PTH 713 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 714 Professional Issues 1 (1 s.h.)
    This course introduces the student to the profession of physical therapy including the history, the professional organizations, and current and future practice trends. Students are also introduced to professional behaviors and expectations, including interprofessional expectations that will be applied throughout the program.

    PTH 721 Research and Critical Inquiry (2 s.h.)
    This course covers concepts and principles of the research process including question, theory and hypothesis development, research design and methodology, and statistical reasoning and analysis. Critical review of professional literature and determination of the relevance and applicability of research findings to specific patient problems is introduced with the goal of promoting evidence-based practice in health care. This course is cross listed with OTH 721 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 722 Special Topics (variable s.h.)
    Exploration of current special topics in physical therapy ex­amination and intervention.

    PTH 723 Continuing Registration for Final Project (1 s.h.)
    Non-credit course intended for students who have completed all program credits but still need to use university resources to complete their degree requirements.

    PTH 725 Independent Study (variable s.h.)
    Independent study in interdisciplinary or discipline specific issues and/or clinical practice with goals, methods, and expected outcomes negotiated in advance with an individual faculty member.

    PTH 725 Perspectives in Global Health Care (1–2 s.h., variable)
    Elective Course. This course provides an exploration of global health care issues with a travel opportunity. Students will participate in service and/or clinical activities as part of the course.

    PTH 726 Musculoskeletal Management 1(4 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. This course is the first in a sequence that provides content on examination and treatment of musculoskeletal conditions in physical therapy. Musculoskeletal injuries and conditions from acute to post-rehabilitation across the lifespan will be discussed. The course will be a regional focus that includes lumbo-sacral and lower quarter examination and treatment.

    PTH 727 Therapeutic Agents (3 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. The course examines the theoretical bases for and therapeutic application of thermal, mechanical, and electrical agents and emphasizes the physical and physiological effects, indications, and contraindications for electrical current, diathermy, superficial heat and cold, massage, ultraviolet, traction, ultrasound, laser, compression therapy, and water.

    PTH 730 Clinical Seminar 1(1 s.h.)
    This is the first course in a sequence that utilizes a case-based learning model to integrate clinical management of common patient diagnoses across the professional disciplines of physical therapy, and occupational therapy. This course is cross listed with OTH 730 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 740 Clinical Education 1 (3 s.h.)
    This four week, full-time clinical learning experience is designed to allow students the opportunity to integrate knowledge acquired during the first year of professional coursework and to apply it in practical physical therapy environments. Students will develop beginning to intermediate skills in physical therapy evaluation and treatment. Students will also develop interpersonal skills necessary to interact with patients, colleagues, and community members. Additionally, students may be exposed to various aspects of the role physical therapy in comprehensive health care delivery and in a current health care environment. This course is offered only on a pass/fail basis.

    PTH 801 Pharmacology(2 s.h.)
    This course covers the basic principles of Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacokinetics, as well as common adverse drug reactions of medications. The students will be exposed to key categories of medications including autonomic, cardiovascular, pain and inflammatory, endocrine, neurological, anti-infective and anti-cancer, as well as key special topics. The focus will be on understanding how these medications impact medical and rehabilitation management of the patient.

    PTH 802 Clinical Imaging(1 s.h.)
    This course provides an introduction to principles of imaging for the health professional including radiography, CT scans, magnetic resonance imaging, and special studies and arthrography. How findings related to imaging impact clinical decision making for patient/client management will be discussed via case studies.

    PTH 803 Foundations of Clinical Exercise 2(3 s.h.)
    Lecture and Lab. This course is a continuation of Foundations of Clinical Exercise 1. This course will serve as a foundation for designing appropriate exercise programs for individuals with cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular issues. Elements of exercise testing and specific prescription will be addressed with focus on the role of the physical therapist in primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention and their role in exercise testing and prescription. Foundational knowledge on nutrition as it relates to exercise will also be included in this course.

    PTH 811 Principles of Teaching and Learning 2 (1 s.h.)
    The course provides an understanding of teaching and learning theories with application to clinical practice for occupational and physical therapy students. Students will examine the means by which to successfully implement teaching and evaluate learning in a clinical setting. This course is cross listed with OTH 811 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 812 Community Practicum (Fall or Spring 2nd Year)(2 s.h.)
    Lecture and lab. Occupational therapy and physical therapy students, working in teams with local community agencies will develop a requested service project that is health related. This course is cross listed with OTH 812 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 813 Professional Issues 2 (1 s.h.)
    This course builds on Professional Issues 1 with the student exploring in more depth issues related to professional socialization including conflict management and negotiation, practice and reimbursement issues, use of substitutes, further integration of ethical decision making, and classroom teaching principles.

    PTH 814 Administration and Organization of Practice Settings(2 s.h.)
    This course provides students with a basic understanding of operational issues related to health care practice in a variety of settings. Topics include leadership and supervision, operational and business success measures, reimbursement, quality assurance, performance improvement, utilization review, risk management, documentation and marketing.

    PTH 815 Professional Issues 3(1 s.h.)
    This course is the final course in the sequence for professional socialization and development. The focus of this course is to provide the student with content related to important state and national issues for the profession and understanding about the governance structure of the profession. The student will prepare for employment with preparation of a resume, cover letter, interview skills, a professional development plan, and exploration of advanced practice opportunities upon graduation.

    PTH 822 Doctoral Project 1(2 s.h.)
    This course is the first in a sequence that leads to the completion of a culminating project for the OTD and DPT curricula. The course will include review of content from Research and Critical Inquiry with a focus on formulating an appropriate research or project question. This course is cross listed with OTH 822 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 823 Doctoral Project 2(1 s.h.)
    This course is the second in a sequence that leads to the completion of a culminating project for the OTD and DPT curricula. Students will select an area of concentration from clinical practice, research, education, service, or advocacy. The student will work with a faculty advisor to develop, plan, and implement a project that will be presented at the completion of the third year prior to graduation. This course is cross listed with OTH 823 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 826 Musculoskeletal Management 2(4 s.h.)
    Lecture and lab. This course continues from Musculoskeletal Management 1 with content for examination and treatment of musculoskeletal conditions in physical therapy. Content will be provided on injuries and conditions from acute to post-rehabilitation across the lifespan. This course will have a regional focus that includes cervical and thoracic spine, TMJ, and upper quarter examination and treatment.

    PTH 827 Musculoskeletal Management 3 (4 s.h.)
    Lecture and lab. This course continues from Musculoskeletal Management 2 with content for examination and treatment of musculoskeletal conditions in physical therapy. Content will be provided on injuries and conditions from acute to post-rehabilitation across the lifespan with a focus on advancing clinical decision making for complex cases, occupational health and work hardening, fabrication and utilization of special equipment, and advanced manual therapy.

    PTH 828 Neuromuscular Management 1 — Adult(5 s.h.)
    Lecture and lab. This course will provide the student with didactic information about the principles of motor learning and motor control that guide the examination, evaluation, and treatment of adults with neurologic dysfunction with focus on stroke, brain injury, spinal cord injury, balance dysfunction, and vestibular deficits.

    PTH 829 Neuromuscular Management  2 — Pediatrics (4 s.h.)
    Lecture and lab. This course is the second in a neuromuscular sequence with a focus on pediatrics. It covers normal motor, psychosocial, neurological, and musculoskeletal development birth through adolescence, models of neurologic dysfunction in pediatrics, principles of examination and evaluation in pediatrics, commonly seen diagnoses, and treatment planning for a pediatric population.

    PTH 830 Clinical Seminar 2 (1 s.h.)
    This is the second in a sequence of courses that utilizes a case-based learning model to integrate clinical management of common patient diagnoses across the professional disciplines of physical therapy and occupational therapy. The focus will be on interprofessional understanding and collaboration in a patient-centered health care delivery model. This course is cross listed with OTH 830 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 831 Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Management(4 s.h.)
    Lecture and lab. This course includes essential principles and procedures related to cardiovascular and pulmonary physical therapy. The content should enable the student to evaluate and treat cardiovascular and pulmonary problems, including complex cases, in inpatient and outpatient PT practice.

    PTH 832 Integumentary Management(4 s.h.)
    Lecture and lab. This course prepares the student to evaluate and treat the patient with integumentary conditions or injuries. Content includes conditions that lead to amputation, limb care and prosthetics, burn management, and fabrication of orthotic devices.

    PTH 833 Health Promotion and Wellness(2 s.h.)
    The course will focus on the basics of health promotion and wellness and the role of the physical therapist in individual wellness assessment, health and wellness for specific physical conditions such as asthma, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and arthritis, as well as considerations for population health.

    PTH 834 Specialty Practice Management(1 s.h.)
    This course will be a seminar course that explores new and emerging practice areas for the field of physical therapy. Students will garner an introduction to some post-entry level practice settings, as well as discuss possible new areas of practice that may be emerging.

    PTH 835 Comprehensive Outcomes(1 s.h.)
    The comprehensive outcomes course is designed to require the student to review all course content for the didactic portion of the curriculum. This will be followed by practical and written testing to ensure the student has integrated the course content and demonstrates readiness to matriculate to the terminal clinical experiences. Focus will be on safety, content knowledge, psychomotor skills for practice, and appropriate clinical reasoning skills.

    PTH 840 Clinical Seminar 3 (1 s.h.)
    This course is the third and final in a sequence of courses that utilize a case-based learning model to integrate clinical management of common patient diagnoses across the professional disciplines of physical therapy, and occupational therapy. Cases in this course will focus on complex medical management. This course is cross listed with OTH 840 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 845 Clinical Education 2(3 s.h.)
    This 4-week, full-time clinical learning experience is designed to allow students the opportunity to develop competence in physical therapy evaluation and treatment. Students will hone clinical reasoning skills and apply scientific rationale in the assessment, planning, and implementation of physical therapy. The focus of this clinical experience will be evaluation and management of patients with complex medical conditions.

    PTH 855 Clinical Education 3(13 s.h.)
    This 14-week, full-time clinical learning experience is the first of two terminal clinical education courses. The course is designed to allow students the opportunity to demonstrate competence in physical therapy evaluation and treatment, applying sound scientific rational and incorporating clinical reasoning and clinical decision-making skills in all aspects of physical therapy care. Students may affiliate in any PT setting depending on availability of sites and student interest.

    PTH 865 Clinical Education 4 (13 s.h.)
    This 16-week, full-time clinical learning experience is the final of two terminal clinical education courses. The course is designed to allow students the opportunity to demonstrate competence in physical therapy evaluation and treatment, applying sound scientific rational and incorporating clinical reasoning and clinical decision-making skills in all aspects of physical therapy care. Students may affiliate in any PT setting depending on availability of sites and student interest.

    PTH 921 Doctoral Project 3 (1 s.h.)
    This course is the third in a sequence that leads to the completion of a culminating project in the OTD and DPT curricula. The focus of this course is to prepare to implement the proposed project/research. This course is cross listed with OTH 921 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

    PTH 922 Doctoral Project 4(1 s.h.)
    This is the final course in a sequence that leads to the completion of a culminating project for the OTD and DPT curricula. The student will present the final project via a poster or platform exhibition during Doctoral Project Week prior to graduation. This course is cross listed with OTH 922 and is an interprofessional collaborative course.

  • Master of Science in Physician Assistant (MSPA)

    David Paulk, program director; Sherry Secrest, director of clinical education

    Overview 

    The developing Master of Science in Physician Assistant Program embraces the team-based, collaborative and interprofessional approach to patient care. Students will work together in coursework, special interprofessional case study groups, research and clinical skills scenarios. This collaboration extends, but is not limited to, students from occupational therapy, physical therapy, medicine, nursing and social work. The MSPA curriculum will be a full-time rigorous professional program with coursework that builds sequentially over 27 months (4 didactic semesters and 1 clinical year). We believe our PA program’s developing curriculum best prepares our graduates to practice the highest quality patient care in a rapidly changing health care environment.

    Mission of the Physician Assistant Program

    The mission of the Physician Assistant (PA) Program at Mary Baldwin College is to academically and clinically prepare students for the practice of medicine as compassionate, effective, well-qualified physician assistants able to serve in a variety of medical specialty areas and settings under the direction and supervision of a licensed physician. This is accomplished in an environment promoting diversity along with respect for self and others. The Physician Assistant Program is committed to interprofessional education, collaboration, and practice. The program’s mission is realized in a dynamic and holistic learning environment dedicated to critical reasoning, engaged learning and scholarship, and innovative teaching with a strong commitment to service, especially for those in underserved or disadvantaged areas. Veritably, the program holds that the primary goal of medical training is service to humanity.

    Curriculum

    The PA curriculum is anticipated to be approved in the Fall of 2014.  

  • Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)

    Drew Gogian Strong, program director

    Overview

    The developing Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN to BSN) Program has a commitment to quality patient-centered care through education, scholarship, practice, and service in an interprofessional environment that fosters cooperation and teamwork. Nursing practice must be grounded in professionalism, evidence, commitment to life-long learning, and service to community and profession. The RN to BSN Program is committed to providing professional education that promotes contemporary practice that is responsive to changes in the health care environment for students, faculty, and clinicians in the Commonwealth of Virginia, the nation, and beyond.

    The RN to BSN Program is a post-licensure program that will lead to a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree. Applicants must hold a current, unrestricted RN license in their state of residence prior to matriculation into the program. The program is offered online asynchronously through the Blackboard® Learning Management System. Face-to-face support will be provided as needed for those new to online education.

    The overall program goals for the RN to BSN Program were developed based on the established accreditation standards set forth by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) and The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (American Association of Colleges of Nursing [AACN], 2008). Consistent with the mission of Mary Baldwin College and Murphy Deming College of Health Sciences, the RN to BSN Program will prepare compassionate and ethical health professionals that strive for excellence through interprofessional collaboration that is responsive to an ever-changing global environment.

    Mission of the RN to BSN Program

    The mission of the RN to BSN Program is to provide a high quality, rigorous online educational program that prepares current practitioners to be transformational and innovative nurse leaders.  This will be accomplished by fostering evidence-based practice, promoting critical decision making, engendering effective inter-professional cooperation, collaboration, and practice, and being responsive to community health care needs.

    In realizing its mission, the goals of the RN to BSN Program at Murphy Deming College of Health Sciences are to:

    • Deliver a flexible, affordable, and rigorous educational program that meets learner and community health care needs.
    • Provide RN-to-BSN students with a broad base of liberal arts education in order to enhance the knowledge, context, and critical thinking abilities necessary for personal fulfillment and professional success in the 21st century.
    • Prepare nursing professionals with the ability to provide holistic, culturally competent, ethical, and evidence-based nursing care to individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations across the lifespan and across the continuum of health care
    • Foster inter-professional communication and collaboration with health care and educational providers in order to enhance the delivery of high quality and safe patient
    • Promote a culture that encourages lifelong learning and professional development for faculty and students.
    • Advocate a strong sense of identity and self-efficacy combined with an understanding of diversity to promote social justice.
    • Enhance institutional quality by engaging in systematic, ongoing assessment to improve the academic program.

    Curriculum

    The RN to BSN Program is in development. The curricular process is anticipated to be completed in the Fall of 2014.