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Education and Teacher Licensure

  • Lowell Lemons, department head
    Sandra Bagby, Tiffany Barber, Sharon Ann Bryant, Karen Dorgan, Kristin Dulaney, Margaret Henderson-Elliott, James McCrory, MegCarolyn Remesz, Robert Remesz, Stephanie Robinson, Jacqueline Stanley, Kathy Tucker, Alice Waddell

    There are multiple paths to teacher licensure for students at Mary Baldwin College, and they are outlined below.

    Undergraduate students preparing to teach must complete all requirements for the BA or BS, complete a major in one of the disciplines or an interdisciplinary major, and meet professional studies requirements and additional requirements particular to the area of licensure.  Students pursuing their undergraduate degree should minor in Education and meet all additional requirements for licensure.

    Students may also minor in Education without pursuing licensure. There are additional options for individuals who already hold a baccalaureate degree and for those who wish to obtain their undergraduate degree, master’s, and licensure in five years.

    Students pursuing Elementary Education Licensure are encouraged to pursue the American Studies major with an emphasis in American Studies for Educators (see American Studies, American Studies for Educators). Students seeking licensure to teach at the secondary level must major in the area in which they intend to teach (see details below).

    Requirements for licensure are approved by the State Department of Education. Due to the multiple requirements, this program should not be attempted by students who plan to graduate from college in less than four years. All students enrolled in the program must devote their final semester entirely to student teaching.

    Through the Post Baccalaureate Teacher Licensure Program, students who already have a bachelor’s degree can pursue initial licensure. For more information on PBTL, please contact Dr. Tiffany Barber. 

    Students seeking both licensure and a graduate degree do so through the Master of Arts in Teaching program. For more information, please, see the Graduate Teacher Education listing.

  • Requirements for a Minor in Education

    19-23 semester hours
    ED 110
    ED 115
    ED 120
    And the requirements for one teaching level:
    * Elementary Education: PSYC 210, ED 300, ED 323, ED 324
    * Middle Education: PSYC 211, ED 310, ED 350
    * Secondary Education: PSYC 211, ED 310, ED 350

    Requirements for a Minor in Art Education

    Paul Ryan, coordinator
    ART 125
    ART 380
    PSYC 210
    PSYC 211
    ED 110
    ED 115
    ED 120
    ED 300
    ED 310
    A major in studio art including: emphasis in one of painting, drawing, printmaking, ceramics, graphic design
    Required standardized tests

    Requirements for a Minor in Music Education

    Lise Keiter, coordinator
    ED 110
    ED 115
    ED 120
    PSYC 210
    PSYC 211
    MUS 310
    MUS 311
    A major in music, either performance emphasis or music history and literature emphasis, including: MUS 217, a minimum of one year of piano, a minimum of one year of voice, and a minimum of six semesters of choir
    Required standardized tests

    Requirements for a Minor in Special Education

    Tiffany Barber, coordinator
    23 semester hours
    ED 111
    ED 115
    ED 205
    ED 215
    ED 305
    ED 315
    PSYC 210
    PSYC 211

    BA/MAT Option

    An option allows students to complete a Bachelor of Arts (BA), a Master of Arts in teaching (MAT), and teacher licensure, typically completed in five years for RCW students. This program is available to both RCW and ADP students. For more information, visit the website at www.mbc.edu/mat/bamat.

    The Following Licenses are Available

    • Elementary Education ( PK–6)
    • Foreign Language — French or Spanish (PK–12)
    • Middle Education (in a teaching subject area for grades 6–8)
    • Music Education — Vocal/Choral (PK–12)
    • Secondary Education (in a teaching subject area for grades 6–12)
    • Special Education — General Curriculum (K–12)
    • Theatre Arts (PK–12)
    • Visual Arts (PK–12)

    Accreditation

    The Teacher Education Program at Mary Baldwin College is approved and accredited by the Virginia Department of Education and by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) for a period of five years from March 2008 to March 2013. This accreditation certifies that the forenamed professional education program has provided evidence that the program adheres to TEAC’s quality principles.

    Application for Admission to Teacher Education Program

    Students in the Residential College for Women and ADP undergraduate students must apply for acceptance into the Teacher Education Program by the end of the sophomore year or upon completion of 53 credit hours. Application forms are available in the Teacher Education Office or online at https://mymbc.mbc.edu/ICS/Teacher_Education/.

    To be accepted for the teacher education program students must:

    • Have a minimum overall GPA of 2.5
    • Have a GPA of 3.0 on professional studies courses
    • Submit a completed application formSubmit passing test scores as shown by one of the following options:
      1. Praxis I scores (Reading, Writing, Math)
      2. SAT or ACT scores
      3. Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) and Praxis I Math scores (or remedy option for students who fail to achieve a passing score on the Praxis I Math assessment)
    • Acceptable minimum passing scores can be found at the following link: http://www.doe.virginia.gov/teaching/educator_preparation/college_programs/entry_assessment.pdf
    • Submit two recommendation forms completed by  people who have observed the professional or academic work ethic of the student
    • Submit a one-page, typed writing sample (topic provided on the application form)
    • Possess suitable personality traits such as character, dependability, emotional stability, interpersonal skills, and temperament, as evidenced by faculty and practicum teachers

    Periodic reappraisal of teacher candidates will be made as students progress through the program.

    Students who have a bachelor’s degree may apply for admission into the Teacher Education Program through the Post Baccalaureate Teacher Licensure Program. These students follow the same admission procedure as undergraduates and are evaluated on the same criteria.

    In the event that a student has been convicted of a felony, and/or had a teaching license revoked by another state, if all other admission requirements have been met and after the Teacher Education Committee has favorably reviewed the application, the student will petition the state, through the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, for an exemption to the felony and license revocation clauses of the Department of Education regulations. The Teacher Education Committee may conditionally admit the person to the Teacher Education program, allowing her/him to take classes; however, the individual will be prohibited from student teaching until the exemption has been approved by the state.

    Requirements for Approval for Teacher Licensure

    • Demonstrated successful student teaching experience
    • Overall 2.5 GPA
    • 3.0 GPA on professional studies course work
    • Submit Math score on Praxis I
    • Passing score on Praxis II
    • Passing score on Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA)
    • Passing score on the Reading for Virginia Educators (RVE) for Elementary and Special Education licensure only
    • Successful completion of Child Abuse Recognition training
    • Successful completion of certification or training in emergency first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and the use of automated external defibrillators (AED).
    • Professional studies and teaching area requirements approved by the Virginia Department of Education (see below).

     

    Computer Technology Competency
    Technology competencies are embedded in the courses leading to teacher licensure through a variety of demonstrations, applications, and projects.

    Elementary Education Licensure (PK–6) Requirements

    • A major in an appropriate area
    • A minor in education at the elementary level
    • Liberal arts course requirements:
      • English (6 credit hours)
        • ENG 102 Intermediate Composition (required)
      • One additional course in literature from among:
        • ENG 111 Introduction to Literature
        • ENG 204 Children’s/Young Adult Literature
        • ENG 208 British Literature before 1780
        • ENG 209 British Literature after 1780
        • ENG/THEA 216 Introduction to Shakespeare
        • ENG 220 American Literature Colonial to Romantic
        • ENG 221 American Literature Realism to Present
        • ENG 264 African-American Literature
        • ENG 334 Modern Poetry
      • Math (9 credit hours)
        • MATH 159 College Algebra or MATH 155 Math in Contemporary Society or higher
        • MATH 156 Numeration and Algebra for Teachers
        • MATH 157 Geometry and Measurement for Teachers
      • Science (7 credit hours from 2 disciplines with one lab course)
        • BIOL 111 Principles of Biology
        • BIOL 112 Diversity of Life
        • BIOL 141 Field Biology
        • BIOL 145 Fresh Water Biology
        • BIOL 148/149 Environmental Issues
        • BIOL 151 Human Health and Disease
        • BIOL 222 Genetics
        • CHEM 101 Forensic Chemistry
        • CHEM 121 General Chemistry I
        • CHEM 151 Chemistry in the Kitchen
        • PHYS/CHEM 100 Exploring the Physical World
        • PHYS 131 Introduction to Astronomy
      • Social Science (6 credit hours: 1 Economics and 1 Geography)
        • ANTH 227 People, Place, and Culture (required)
        • ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics or ECON 150 Experimental Economics
      • History (9 credit)
        • HIST 101 Western Civilization to 1648
        • HIST 102 Western Civilization from 1648
        • HIST 111 Survey of U.S. History to 1877
        • HIST 112 Survey of U.S. History from 1877
      • Arts (6 credit hours required)
      • *Psychology
        • PSYC 210 Child Psychology
          • Note: PSYC 111 Introduction to Psychology as a Social Science recommended
      • Professional studies courses
        • ED 325 Classroom & Behavior Management
        • ED 382 Student Teaching
        • ED 386 Student Teaching Seminar
          • Required tests: Praxis I Math score, passing scores on Praxis II, passing scores on Reading for Virginia Educators (RVE) passing scores on Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA).

    Note: 6 semester hours of master’s level work may be applied to the above requirements.

    Middle Education Licensure (6–8) Requirements

    • A major that includes 21 semester hours in one subject area, selected from language arts, social science, mathematics, or science
    • A minor in education at the middle school level
    • Additional required courses:
      • HIST 111 Survey of U.S. History to 1877
      • ED 325 Classroom & Behavior Management
      • ED 383 Student Teaching
      • ED 386 Student Teaching Seminar
    • Required tests: Praxis I Math score, passing scores on Praxis II, passing scores on Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA)

    Note: Six semester hours of master’s level work may be applied to these requirements.

    Secondary Education Licensure (6–12) Requirements

    • A major in a teaching area, selected from business education, English, history and social science, mathematics, science (biology or chemistry with optional addition of earth science)
    • A minor in education at the secondary level
    • The following additional requirements:
      • ED 325 Classroom & Behavior Management
      • ED 384 Student Teaching in Secondary Education
      • ED 386 Student Teaching Seminar
    • The requirements for a teaching field (see below)
    • Tests required for secondary education: Praxis I Math score, passing scores on Praxis II, passing scores on Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA)

    Business Education (6–12)

    • CS 180 Fundamentals of Computer Systems
    • The requirements for secondary licensure

    Note: Business majors are encouraged to take BUAD 306 The Entrepreneur, which may be used to meet major requirements.

    English (6–12)
    36 semester hours

    • A major in English, including coursework covering all of the following:
      Language: history and nature of English language, comparative English grammar, standard written English
      Literature: British, American, world literature, and literary theory/criticism
      Composition: teaching of writing, with emphasis upon advanced composition
      Oral language: oral expression in both formal and informal presentations
    • The requirements for secondary licensure (see above)
    • A license in journalism may be added to an English license with these requirements:
      • COMM 115 Mass Communication
      • COMM 212 Mass Media Law and Ethics
      • COMM 221 Mass Media Writing
      • COMM 280 Intercultural Communication
      • INT 251 The Writer in the World:  Professional Writing 

    History and Social Science (6-12)
    The student seeking licensure in History and Social Science will demonstrate an understanding of knowledge, skills, and processes of history and the social science disciplines as defined by the Virginia History and Social Science Standards of Learning. To be licensed as a teacher in History and Social Science, the applicant shall major in history or political science.

    For History Majors:
    HIST 101 Western Civilization to 1648
    HIST 102 Western Civilization from 1648
    HIST 111 Survey of U.S. History to 1877
    HIST 112 Survey of U.S. History from 1877
    HIST 400 Senior Seminar
    POLS 100 Introduction to American Government and Politics
    POLS 111 Comparative Politics
    POLS 128 U.S. Foreign Policy or POLS 221 International Relations
    ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics
    ECON 102 Principles of International and Macroeconomics
    ANTH 227 People, Place and Culture
    Plus at least one course from the recommended list (see below).

    For Political Science Majors:
    POLS 100 Introduction to American Government and Politics
    POLS 111 Comparative Politics
    POLS 128 U.S. Foreign Policy or POLS 221 International Relations
    POLS 400 Senior Seminar
    HIST 101 Western Civilization to 1648
    HIST 102 Western Civilization from 1648
    HIST 111 Survey of U.S. History to 1877
    HIST 112 Survey of U.S. History from 1877
    ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics
    ECON 102 Principles of International and Macroeconomics
    ANTH 227 People, Place and Culture
    Plus at least one course from the recommended list (see below).

    Recommended courses to support History and Social Science endorsement:
    HIST 203, HIST 265, POLS 203, POLS 205, PHIL 201, PHIL 202, and REL 202.

    Mathematics (6–12)

    • A major in mathematics that includes applied mathematics, computer science, and computer programming.
    • Algebra I — add-on
    • And the following requirements:
      • MATH 159 College Algebra
      • MATH 157 Geometry and Measurement for Teachers
      • MATH 171 Precalculus with Trigonometry
      • MATH 214 Intermediate Statistical Methods
      • MATH 221 History of Mathematics
      • MATH 341 Modern Geometry
    • The requirements for secondary licensure (see above).

    Sciences (6–12)

    Applicants with a major in Biology or Chemistry may receive the add-on license in earth and space science with the completion of 17 semester hours. The applicant shall complete the following course at Mary Baldwin College: PHYS 131 Introduction to Astronomy. The remaining courses for the add-on license shall be taken at Washington and Lee University through the consortium arrangement: General Geology, Historical Geology, Meteorology, Oceanography, and Mineralogy.

    For Biology Majors:

    • The major in biology including all of the following: genetics/molecular biology, botany, zoology, anatomy/physiology, ecology, and other preparation consistent with the Virginia Science Standards of Learning.
    • The requirements for secondary licensure (see above).

    For Chemistry Majors:

    • Students seeking licensure to teach chemistry will complete the major in chemistry including all of the following: inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, and analytical chemistry and will demonstrate an understanding of knowledge, skills, and processes of chemistry as defined in the Virginia Science Standards of Learning.
    • The requirements for secondary licensure (see above).

    Education Licensure (PK–12) Requirements

    Art Education (PK–12)

    • Major in studio art including: emphasis in one of painting, drawing, printmaking, ceramics, graphic design
      • ART 125 Introduction to Art Education
      • ART 380 Teaching Assistantship in Art
    • These courses:
      • ED 110 Practicum in Education, with at least one practicum at the middle school level.
      • ED 115 Foundations of Education
      • ED 120 Understanding Exceptional Individuals
      • ED 300 Elementary School Methods and Practicum
      • ED 310 Middle and Secondary Methods and Practicum
      • ED 325 Classroom and Behavior Management
      • ED 385 Student Teaching in Art Education
      • ED 386 Student Teaching Seminar
      • PSYC 210 Child Psychology
      • PSYC 211 Adolescent Psychology
    • Required standardized tests

    Foreign Languages — Modern: French  or Spanish (PK–12)

    • A major in a modern language, including the following areas: advanced grammar and composition, conversation, culture and civilization, and literature and applied linguistics
    • A minor in secondary education
    • And these additional courses:
      • ED 300 Elementary School Methods and Practicum
      • ED 325 Classroom and Behavior Management
      • ED 386 Student Teaching Seminar
      • ED 389 Student Teaching in Foreign Language
      • PSYC 210 Child Psychology
      • PSYC 211 Adolescent Psychology
    • Required standardized tests

    Note: For an added endorsement in a modern foreign language: 24 semester hours in the language.

    Music Education — Vocal/Choral (PK–12)

    • A major in music, either performance emphasis or music history and literature emphasis, including:
      • MUS 217 Choral Conducting
      • A minimum of one year of piano
      • A minimum of one year of voice
      • A minimum of six semesters of choir
    • These courses:
      • ED 110 Practicum in Education
      • ED 115 Foundations of Education
      • ED 120 Understanding Exceptional Individuals
      • ED 325 Classroom & Behavior Management
      • ED 386 Student Teaching Seminar
      • ED 392 Student Teaching in Music
      • PSYC 210 Child Psychology
      • PSYC 211 Adolescent Psychology
      • MUS 310 Music Education in the Elementary School
      • MUS 311 Music Education in the Secondary School
    • Required standardized tests

    Special Education — General Curriculum (K-12)

    25 semester hours

    • Required courses:
      • ED 111 Practicum in Special Education
      • ED 115 Foundations of Education
      • ED 205 Characteristics of Exceptionality
      • ED 215 Foundations and Legal Issues of Special Education
      • ED 218 Transitioning in the Special Education Environment
      • ED 305 Classroom Management and Collaboration
      • ED 315 Differential Strategies in Instruction and Assessment for Special Education
      • ED 323 Language Acquisition and Reading I
      • ED 324 Language Acquisition and Reading II and Practicum
      • PSYC 210 Child Psychology
      • PSYC 211 Adolescent Psychology
    • Required standardized tests

    Theatre Arts (PK–12)

    Students seeking licensure in theatre arts shall demonstrate knowledge, skills, and processes of the theatre discipline as defined in the Virginia Standards of Learning.

    • The major in Theatre
    • These courses:
      • ED 110 Practicum in Education
      • ED 115 Foundations of Education
      • ED 120 Understanding Exceptional Individuals
      • ED 300 Elementary School Methods and Practicum
      • ED 310 Middle and Secondary Methods and Practicum
      • ED 325 Classroom and Behavior Management
      • ED 386 Student Teaching Seminar
      • ED 391 Student Teaching in Theatre
      • PSYC 210 Child Psychology
      • PSYC 211 Adolescent Psychology
    • Required standardized tests
  • 110 Practicum in Education (3 s.h.) (C)
    This course is designed to provide students who are contemplating teaching as a career to acquire early and varied experiences in area school classrooms. Students will meet several afternoons with their practicum supervisor for the practicum seminar. A minimum of 90 hours will be spent in the classroom. Students must complete this course prior to the senior year. *Prerequisite: ED 115.

    111 Practicum in Special Education (3 s.h.) (C)
    This course is designed to give students who are contemplating a career in special education an opportunity to observe and assist teachers in the classroom. Students will complete a  90 hour practicum.

    115 Foundations of Education (3 s.h.) (T)
    The goals of this introductory course are: to acquaint students with the philosophical schools of thought in education and with prominent educators whose contributions have shaped educational theory and practice; and to enhance students’ skills in reading, writing, thinking, and discussing critically and analytically. *Prerequisite for ED 110.

    120 Understanding Exceptional Individuals (3 s.h.)
    This course is about exceptional children and youth with learning and/or behavior problems, or who are gifted and talented, or who have physical disabilities. The course is a study of the field of special education and the exceptional individuals.

    125 Introduction to Art Education (3 s.h.)
    For course description, see ART 125 in the Art and Art History, Art Education listing.

    157 Computer Technology for Teachers (3 s.h.)
    This online course prepares teachers to use computer technology within the classroom to enhance, augment, and enlarge opportunities for learning. Offered as needed to ADP students.

    205 Characteristics of Exceptionality (3 s.h.)
    Students demonstrate knowledge of definitions, characteristics, and learning and behavior support needs of children and youth with disabilities, including learning disabilities, emotional disturbance, mental retardation, developmental delay, autism, traumatic brain injury, attention deficit disorders, other health impairments, and multiple disabilities, among others. They develop understanding of normal patterns of development (physical, psycho-motor, cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional) and educational implications of various disabilities.

    215 Foundations and Legal Issues of Special Education (3 s.h.)
    Prospective teachers learn the foundation for educating students with disabilities, including: historical perspectives, theories and philosophies, and current trends in the field of special education. They develop an understanding and application of legal aspects and regulatory requirements associated with the identification, education and evaluations of disabled students. Emphasizes ability to analyze ethical issues and to apply accepted standards of professional behavior.

    218 Transitioning in the Special Education Environment (1 s.h.)
    This course is a requirement for students who are seeking teacher licensure with an endorsement in Special Education. Focus will be on development of skills and knowledge in preparation for working with parents and families to provide post-secondary transitions as well as transitions while in school, case management, consultation and collaboration. Emphasis will be on transition planning in the IEP — Individualized Education Plan, transition system delivery, independent living skills, career development, community resources, available agencies, self-advocacy, guardianship, and implementation of inter-agency agreements for successful transitioning to employment and self-sustainment. Students will develop an understanding of the best practices in transitioning, the Model of Transition Pathways, transition assessment, Federal Legislation, transition provisions in IDEA 2004, NCLB 2001, and alignment of transition with Standards-Based Education. Participants will learn how to become a transition leader for their students when they are a Special Education teacher, and they will know how to improve transition outcomes during the school years as well as postsecondary for youth with disabilities and for youth placed at risk.

    300 Elementary School Methods and Practicum (4 s.h.)
    Conceptualizes the teacher as one who makes and carries out decisions about curriculum and instruction, based on principles of teaching and learning. Instructional planning and classroom management are emphasized. A 30 hour field experience in a PK-6 classroom integrates theory with practice. Prerequisite for ED382; should be taken the semester before student teaching, if possible.

    305 Classroom Management and Collaboration in Special Education Setting (3 s.h.)
    Prospective teachers learn classroom and behavior management techniques and individual interventions, develop skills required to collaborate with regular education colleagues and with families of students with disabilities, learn and practice skills in consultation, case management, and collaboration needed to assist and support students and families in successful transitions within the K-12 school system and beyond.

    310 Middle and Secondary Methods and Practicum (4 s.h.) (R)
    Experience with methods and materials for grades 6-12. They demonstrate knowledge and skills in setting goals and objectives, unit and lesson planning, varying teaching techniques, classroom management, individualizing instruction, measuring and evaluating learning, selecting teaching materials, using multimedia, and developing an effective teaching style and confidence in speaking. A 30 hour field experience in a grade 6-12 classroom integrates theory with practice.   *Prerequisite for ED 383 and ED 384; should be taken in fall, senior year.

    315 Differentiated Strategies in Instruction and Assessment for Special Education (4 s.h.)
    Students learn service delivery models, curriculum, instruction of students with disabilities, and skills for application. Includes alternative ways to teach content, curriculum adaptation and modification, strategies for integration of students with disabilities with non-disabled peers, uses of technology in learning. Examines procedures to develop, provide, and evaluate instruction consistent with students’ individual needs: procedures for screening, prereferral, referral, eligibility determination. Considers factors that may influence assessment findings, related ethical issues, application of results to guide development of individual education plans. Required 30 hour practicum.

    323 Language Acquisition and Reading I (3 s.h.)
    This course will develop in beginning elementary teachers a thorough understanding of the complex nature of language acquisition and literacy, including but not limited to phonemic awareness, concept of print, phonics, vocabulary development, and comprehension. Students will investigate formal and informal diagnostic measures, instructional procedures, and corrective strategies for varied reading difficulties. Students will develop knowledge of reading and writing processes, compelling theories of reading and writing pedagogy including strategies for working with English language learners. Students will become familiar with criteria for identifying excellence in children’s literature and elements of a balanced literacy program which includes a variety of literature and independent reading.

    324 Language Acquisition and Reading II and Practicum (4 s.h.)
    Learning to read and write is a developmental process that can be systematically advanced through the use of specific instructional strategies. This course will provide beginning elementary teachers the knowledge and skills required to recognize, assess, and respond to children’s learning needs as emerging readers and writers. Students will examine various strategies including but not limited to word study, phonics, vocabulary, and spelling designed to accelerate progress in children who encounter reading difficulties. Students will also explore learning opportunities for children who are moving along in the reading continuum more rapidly than their classmates. Strategies for drawing children into literature and utilizing authentic children’s books in reading instruction are included. Students will field test literacy strategies introduced in the ED 323/324 sequence in a 30-hour practicum placement in the semester in which they are enrolled in ED 324.

    325 Classroom Behavior Management (3 s.h.)
    This course presents behavioral, cognitive, and psycho-educational theories along with behavior management strategies and positive behavior intervention plans. Emphasis will include current research on behavior management in the classroom for grades K-12, cognitive restructuring for the social cognitive approach, and current practices. Strategies for learning how to help students with intrinsic motivation will be taught.  These strategies can enable students to remain in control of their behavior and make positive choices. Focus will be on teaching students to perceive situations in an appropriate manner which will change their thought patterns regarding social situations and assist them in becoming efficient problem solvers. This focus views students as change agents whereby teachers guide them to manage their own behavior change as well as their own behavior patterns. Research has shown that these strategies have significant impact on interpersonal conflicts within the educational setting. Students will examine the structure of effectively managed whole group classrooms as well as individual behavior management and the development of social behaviors. Response measures will be presented for use in data analysis for behavior management within the classroom. Participants will development a behavior management plan for their classroom which incorporates management plans needed for individual students as they utilize skills for enhancing a supportive learning environment.

    350 Content Area Reading (3 s.h.)
    This course requires students to examine research and instructional subjects concentrating on high school students and adults. Students design experiences that examine uses of content area texts capitalizing on critical reading and writing. Course participants will field test all activities described and studied in this course.

    Student Teaching
    Students who are admitted to the Teacher Education Program are eligible to apply for student teaching during their final semester.

    Requirements for Admission to Student Teaching:

    • Full admission to the Teacher Education Program and continue to meet requirements
    • Application for student teaching prior to the published deadline
    • Satisfactory completion of a 90 hour practicum experience in local public schools
    • Documentation of successful field experiences
    • Suitability for teaching as demonstrated in course work and field experiences
    • Overall GPA of 2.5 or higher
    • Minimum GPA of 3.0 in professional studies courses
    • A grade of C or better in the following courses: any ED course, PYSC 210, PYSC 211, MATH 156, and Math 157
    • Submit passing test scores as shown by one of the following options:
      • Praxis I scores (Reading, Writing, Math)
      • SAT or ACT scores
      • Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) and Praxis I Math scores (or remedy option for students who fail to achieve a passing score on the Praxis I Math assessment)
    • Acceptable minimum passing scores can be found at the following link: http://www.doe.virginia.gov/teaching/educator_preparation/college_programs/entry_assessment.pdf
    • Demonstrated personal and professional qualities, including responsibility, effective communication, enthusiasm, resourcefulness, flexibility, and professional behavior

    Note: Approval for student teaching does not necessarily mean licensure approval. Candidates for licensure must demonstrate successful student teaching experience, an overall 2.5 GPA, and 3.0 GPA on professional studies courses. Elementary Education students must take Praxis I Math and pass Praxis II, pass the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA), and pass the Reading for Virginia Educators (RVE) assessment. Middle and Secondary Education students must take Praxis I Math and pass Praxis II if available, and pass the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA).

    Student Teaching Courses (12 s.h. each)
    Student teaching requires one semester working directly with students in a classroom on a full-time basis, for a minimum of 12 weeks under the direction of a classroom teacher and college supervisor. For students seeking endorsement in Art, Music or Special Education, the student teaching experience shall be split into 8 weeks in an elementary setting and 8 weeks in a secondary setting, to total a 16-week placement. Student teachers may not work, take courses, or participate in varsity sports. Application must be made the semester prior to student teaching. *Prerequisite for ED 382 is ED 300. Prerequisite for ED 383 and ED 384 is ED 310.

    382 Elementary Education (PK–6) (O)
    383 Middle Education (6–8) (O)
    384 Secondary Education (6–12) (O)
    385 Student Teaching in Art Education (PK–12) (O)
    389 Student Teaching in Foreign Language (PK–12) (O)
    391 Student Teaching in Theatre (PK–12) (O)
    392 Student Teaching in Music Education (PK–12) (O)
    393 Student Teaching in Special Education (K–12)

    386 Student Teaching Seminar (1–3 s.h.)
    Seminar is held in conjunction with student teaching. This experience allows students to discuss and examine critical issues related to student teaching. Spring semester only for RCW students.