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What kind of support does the Help Desk give students?

When I call the Help Desk, can I request a specific technician to help me?

Should I use Windows or Mac?

How Can I Keep My Windows OS Secure and Up-to-date?

My office computer is getting old, how do I get a new one?

I need more memory/new video card/keyboard/mouse/monitor/printer. How do I get this?

Can Faculty and Staff install Microsoft Products on their personal computers so they can Work From Home?

What Software Can I Lease? 

How Do I Order the Software?

What About Students?

Can Faculty and Staff install personal software on their work computers?

I need software installed on my office machine, how do I get it?

My Powerpoint presentation file size is huge! How can I reduce the size of it?

Watch for embedded objects, pasted or dragged graphics

 

What kind of support does the Help Desk give students?

Unfortunately, we can only provide limited support to students. We can provide a CD for you with anti-spyware tools and other useful utilities. Beyond that however, you will need to pay someone to fix your machine. We have a list of recommended service providers, which can be found here: http://www.mbc.edu/oit/studentcomputingpcfix/

When I call the Help Desk, can I request a specific technician to help me?

Unfortunately no.  OIT is most effective and responsive when we assign the most capable and readily available technician.  We ask that you please don’t call a specific technician at their extension, but rather the main Help Desk line (7075 or **).

Should I use Windows or Mac?

This has been a question many have been asking for years now. Both Windows and Mac operating systems have their pros and cons. Students who are using graphical designing, movie editing or certain sound recording software often use Macs for this purpose. The majority of faculty, staff and lab computers on campus use Windows XP.  It’s always a good idea to research both sides before making a decision.  Ask any friends or coworkers you use either of the operating systems to get an idea of what issues they come across. The one important thing to remember however is that the Mary Baldwin College network supports both operating systems.  Just remember that whichever operating system you get to always install any updates that come out as they are released to make sure your system stays secure.

How Can I Keep My Windows OS Secure and Up-to-date?

You never know when a new Windows bug or vulnerability has been discovered that could wreak havoc on your computer.  With Windows 98 and later Windows versions, Microsoft has made it EASY to keep your computer up to date and secure.  All you need to do is occasionally run the “Windows Update” from your computer.  Simply click on Start, then choose the Windows Update Icon at the top of the menu.  This will take you to the MS Windows Update site and run a wizard. Be sure to select all “Critical Updates”, and you will be set! Everything else found on the update site is optional and generally not required.

My office computer is getting old, how do I get a new one?

Most computers on campus are updated on a rotational cycle approximately every 4 years.  Power users are updated more frequently.  If your department has funding for new computers, you can request an update at anytime.  Simply submit a help request along with the details of the computer setup you need, along with your account number. Still have questions?  Call OIT Director Bill Betlej.

I need more memory/new video card/keyboard/mouse/monitor/printer. How do I get this?

If OIT has some stock on these items, and we can provide them to MBC owned computers at no charge. However, if we do not have an item on hand your department will likely need to pay for these items. But all purchases for anything computer related – except print cartridges – should be funneled through OIT. Usually we can save you money because of our education sources. To request new equipment, please submit a help request for the needed equipment along with your departmental account number.

Can Faculty and Staff install Microsoft Products on their personal computers so they can Work From Home?

Microsoft Work-at-Home Agreement (Faculty / Staff)

Mary Baldwin College faculty and staff may purchase media for licensed Microsoft software for use at home under the Mary Baldwin College/Microsoft Campus Agreement. This one year agreement includes an option for faculty and staff to lease Microsoft software for one year (during the current term of the Campus Agreement) for work related use at your home. If you leave the College or the College decides to no longer participate in the agreement, you must remove the software from your personal computer. Participating colleges have paid the one-year license fee for the software that faculty/staff can order for Work-at-Home use. Because you are only paying for the media (the CDs), the prices are very low. The media is available through Journey Ed at www.journeyed.com/go.asp?KEY=CAMARYBALD

What Software Can I Lease? 

The titles include Microsoft Office XP Pro (Office XP Pro contains Word, Excel, Access, & PowerPoint, Publisher, Internet Explorer 6.0.), and many others. See the Order Form at http://collegebuys.org/ for a complete listing.

The Legal Details – Please Read This!

The media is made available to you only while Mary Baldwin has the Microsoft® Campus Agreement 3.0. You have the right to use the software for school-related purposes at home. You are not licensed to use the software at home for personal purposes. You do not own the license or the CDs, rather you are leasing the license from your institution for the term of the Campus Agreement 3.0. You will be required to remove the software from your home machine if your institution does not renew the Campus Agreement 3.0 or if you leave the school. The license agreement with Microsoft® does not include free access to phone help from Microsoft®. Hardcopy manuals are not included but are available online from Microsoft. There is also online help at www.microsoft.com and FCCC provides limited technical assistance by email. You will be held responsible for unauthorized use of your unique Special Product Keys. This agreement can be found at http://www.microsoft.com/education/license/terms.asp.
How Do I Order the Software?

Orders can be mailed or faxed. Go to the FCCC website http://collegebuys.org/for additional information, including pricing, ordering forms and other discounted products and services. Choose Microsoft Media Ordering and then the Order Form for Council of Independent Colleges in Virginia. Orders cannot be handled or processed through OIT.

What About Students?

OIT is presently working with Microsoft to offer our students with affordable software as well.  More details to be announced soon!

Can Faculty and Staff install personal software on their work computers?

No. MBC owned computers are for campus business only and as such MBC must own all software.  Please see our Appropriate Use Policy: http://academic.mbc.edu/cis/PDF/13.9_Intellectual_Property.pdf

I need software installed on my office machine, how do I get it?

All software purchases must be made through OIT and are charged back to the individual department.

My Powerpoint presentation file size is huge! How can I reduce the size of it?

The file size of Powerpoint presentations can grow rapidly, especially those with many images embedded in them. Try some of these methods to reduce the size:

Turn off fast saves

First off, you’ll need to do a little setup in PowerPoint. On the Tools menu, click Options, click the Save tab, and then clear the Allow fast saves check box. Doing this forces PowerPoint to remove excess data from your presentation file each time you save.

After you’ve turned off fast saves, save your presentation again under a new name. On the File menu, click Save As, type a name for the new version of your presentation in the File namebox, and then click OK.

In fact, it’s a good idea to save another copy of your presentation before continuing. Some of the following steps make irreversible changes to your presentation. You’ll want a backup copy of your slide show.

Watch out for oversize image files.

In most cases, images don’t need to be much larger than 1024 x 768 pixels. If your images are larger than this, your PowerPoint files are probably bigger than they need to be.

1. Right-click the picture, and then click Format Picture on the shortcut menu.

2. In the Format dialog box, click the Picture tab, and then click Compress.

3. Under Apply to, do one of the following:

To compress just the current picture, click Selected pictures.

To compress all the pictures in your presentation, click All pictures in document.

4. Under Change resolution, do one of the following:

If your presentation will be used for a screen show, click Web/Screen.

If you plan to distribute your presentation as printed pages, click Print.

5. Under Options, select the Compress pictures check box and the Delete cropped areas of pictures check box.

6. Click OK.

7. If prompted, click Apply in the Compress Pictures dialog box.

Watch for embedded objects, pasted or dragged graphics

If possible, bring images into PowerPoint by doing the following: On the Insert menu, point to Picture, and then click From File.

When you copy and paste (or drag) an image or a graphic that includes an image from another program into PowerPoint, PowerPoint may create an embedded OLE object. The OLE object includes a Windows Metafile (WMF) picture of the image. PowerPoint normally compresses images very efficiently, but it can’t compress images in WMFs, so copying and pasting or dragging images into your files can make your files quite large.

Embedded objects are easy to shrink. After you no longer need to edit the image (by double-clicking it), do the following: Right-click the image, point to Grouping on the shortcut menu, and then click Ungroup. Next, immediately right-click the image again, point to Grouping on the shortcut menu, and then click Regroup. Ungrouping throws away the OLE data and leaves just the picture – in a form that PowerPoint can now compress.

Incidentally, it’s okay to copy and paste images from one slide to another within PowerPoint. PowerPoint stores only one copy of the image no matter how many times you use it, so reusing an image can actually help keep your file sizes down.

Watch for embedded objects, pasted or dragged graphics

If possible, bring images into PowerPoint by doing the following: On the Insert menu, point to Picture, and then click From File.

When you copy and paste (or drag) an image or a graphic that included an image from another program into PowerPoint, PowerPoint may create an embedded OLE object. The OLE object includes a Windows Metafile (WMF) picture of the image. PowerPoint normally compresses images very efficiently, but it can’t compress images in WMFs, so copying and pasting or dragging images into your files can make your files quite large.

Embedded objects are easy to shrink. After you no longer need to edit the image (by double-clicking it), do the following: Right-click the image, point to grouping on the shortcut menu, and then click Ungroup. Next, immediately right-click the image again, point to grouping on the shortcut menu, and then click Regroup. Ungrouping throws away the OLE data and leaves just the picture – in a form that PowerPoint can now compress.

Incidentally, it’s okay to copy and paste images from one slide to another within PowerPoint. PowerPoint stores only one copy of the image no matter how many times you use it, so reusing an image can actually help keep your file sizes down.


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