Boldly Baldwin word mark

How do I check my MBC Voice Mail from Off Campus?

How do I change my voicemail greeting?

I’m changing dorm rooms.  How do I keep my number?

My phoneline has gone dead. How can I get this fixed?

Why can’t I get a call from someone off campus in my dorm lounge?

Why do some of the dorms have red phones in the hallway?

Why do I occasionally get a small charge on my department’s long distance phone bill for making a Staunton phone call? 

 

How do I check my MBC Voice Mail from Off Campus?

You can quickly and easily check your MBC Voice Mail from any phone, anywhere! Simply call 540-887-7200 and Marsha the Virtual Operator will welcome you to the system and give you the option to dial a number, or to PRESS * if you have a mailbox on the system.  To check your voice mail, PRESS # when instructed, and then enter your mail box number.  Marsha will then prompt you for to enter your password — and viola you are in!  Now you can play messages, changes your greeting just like from on campus!  Remember this might be a long distance call depending on where you are calling from.

How do I change my voicemail greeting?

There are 3 main greetings and some sub sets. Here is the way you would change your greetings. All campus voice mailboxes have the ability to allow the caller to opt out of your message by pressing 0. If the caller opts out, they will be connect to your department main line or security. You may suggest this to the caller in your personal message. To change your greeting, sign in to your voice mail box and from the main menu use Option 4; Personal Options and then choose Option 3; Greetings. You have 3 types of greeting to choose from.

1) From the Greeting menu you can choose Option 1 which is titled Personal greetings. From within this menu you have 2 more choices. Sub Option 1 will play for the caller a generic greeting followed by your recorded mail box name. Sub Option 2 will allow you to record a personal message. If you choose to record a personal greeting, you now have 2 additional choices. You may simply record your personal message to be played to the caller when you are both away from your desk or on the phone. Or, you may choose a separate personal message which will be played to the caller when you are on the phone.

2) Again from the Greeting menu you can choose an Extended absence greeting. This personal greeting will be played back to caller and it will not allow them to leave you a message. You may use this for such things as vacation, summer break, sabbatical, etc. Remember, the caller can not leave you a message.

3) The last option in the Greeting menu is for recorded mail box name. This is the greeting you hear just before you enter your password.

I’m changing dorm rooms.  How do I keep my number?

You must first contact the student life office to request your dorm room change.  Once that has been received, CIS will transfer your voice mail to the new dorm phone number.

My phoneline has gone dead. How can I get this fixed?

You will need to contact the Help Desk by creating a Help Request, coming in person or using another phone.

Why can’t I get a call from someone off campus in my dorm lounge?

All common access phones, such as those in hallways, lounges, parking lots and classrooms, are ‘on campus’ phones only. They will have an extension in the 6000 range. They act just like any other phone on campus except for dialing long distance. Since these are phone extensions created by Mary Baldwin, they cannot be called from off campus.

Why do some of the dorms have red phones in the hallway?

These phones have a dual purpose. They act like a regular on campus extension unless there is a catastrophic failure of the campus phone system. These phones will automatically switch over and become like a standard home phone. Hence both phone numbers are listed on the phone.

Why do I occasionally get a small charge on my department’s long distance phone bill for making a Staunton phone call? 

It is all in the way you dial the phone. If you dial 8 plus 1 plus 540 plus the local number the switch will route your call down a long distance line. The college gets charged and we pass that charge back to your department. Just dial 8 plus the 7 digit number and your department will not be charged back for the local call.

For instance, if I wanted to call the local Pizza Hut, I could dial from my office phone, 8 1 540 885 8875 and it will connect. The problem with dialing this way is that our phone system sends this call out using our long distance circuits. The 1 and the 540 tells it to do that. Our long distance service provider, Qwest, will bill us for these calls because they have to handle them. If I call 8 885 8875 then the call goes down one of our local circuits. Those calls are not directly charged back to the departments.

This is not a huge problem. We charged back about $13.00 last month across the whole campus. But that amount builds over time.

The best way to fix the problem is to simply dial the local number correctly by not including the 1 and the 540 area code. If the call can not be completed as dialed, a local operator error message will be played stating you must first dial the area code before calling this number. Harrisonburg, for instance, is a long distance call. Waynesboro is a local call.

A second remedy would be to re-program our phone switch blocking all but what we tell it is a local number. The cost of doing that far exceeds the amount being charged back. And any re-programming is fraught with hidden problems. New local phone numbers are added without warning. New cell phones, pagers and local access carriers can have their own exchanges; or the first 3 digits. If we do not know about the new numbers, they will not be able to be called at all. Continually monitoring and re-programming would also cost big money.

So be a smart dialer and make those local calls using just 8 and the seven digit number.

 

 
 
Staunton, Virginia                                                                                                                                                      © Mary Baldwin College
Contact Us                                                                                                                                                                                 All Rights Reserved