Boldly Baldwin word mark

Public History

Faculty

Rick Potter

epotter@mbc.edu

1Potter403“Teaching is about providing a wider context in order to better understand the past. By drawing on cultural aspects such as art, architecture, music, politics, and technology it is possible to engage students so they leave with a more concrete understanding of history’s importance. My goal is to help students recognize their personal connection with history and understand how they are impacted by the actions of historical figures.”

  • BA College of William and Mary (history and fine arts)
  • MA University of Virginia (architectural history, preservation)
  • PhD Auburn University (history)

Edmund (Rick) Potter is an assistant professor of history for Mary Baldwin College. He teaches both for the Residential College and the Adult Degree Program. Dr. Potter’s areas of scholarly interest include the history of technology, architectural history, modern Europe, and America post 1865. His dissertation examined the role of World War I in shaping the social use of architecture in inter-war Birmingham, England. He is a member of the American Historical Association, the Society of the History of Technology, the Society of Architectural Historians, and Phi Alpha Theta. Dr. Potter began his career in preservation in 1983 with the restoration of the Lobby of the Joseph Nichols Tavern, built in 1815. Since then, he has worked for the Lynchburg Museum System, Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest, the National Park Service, and served for seven years as the Curator of Collections at the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library. He has organized and participated in numerous restoration projects and co-written two National Register nominations.

Amy Tillerson

atillers@mbc.edu

Amy Tilllerson

“It is my objective to convince students that you cando history. It is an active discipline where they do not have to just be passive acceptors of facts and figures.”

  • BA Virginia Tech (English)
  • MA Virginia Tech (student personnel services/counseling)
  • PhD Morgan State University (history)

Amy Tillerson is a native of Prince Edward County. For her dissertation, Tillerson researched the activism of Black women in Prince Edward County, Virginia between 1930 and 1965. Prince Edward County is most well known for the school crisis that closed public schools for five years. Before accepting her position at Mary Baldwin College, Amy was director of African American Heritage Program at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities at UVA. She has taught in the history departments at University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, Morgan State, and Piedmont Virginia Community College. She has also been a public school teacher and counselor in Roanoke City Public Schools and Baltimore City Public Schools. She is the advisor to Phi Alpha Theta, the history honor society.