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Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity

Our emphasis on undergraduate research, scholarship, and creative activity represents Mary Baldwin College’s commitment to developing students who not only know but do.

From field to studio, from library to laboratory, from far-away places to right next door, Mary Baldwin students know there are multiple ways to find the answer. Whether investigating medieval frescos in an Italian cathedral or collecting feather and blood samples from songbirds to quantify differences in parasite loads, excellence in research, scholarship, and creative activity is their goal.

Mary Baldwin College’s distinctive major programs allow seniors to carry out original research or creative projects in collaboration with faculty mentors, ensuring the chance for hands-on experience that provides substance to your curiosity.  The Capstone project integrates and builds on classroom work, community service, international travel, internships, and/or undergraduate research experiences, putting you one step ahead of others when you enter graduate school or launch your career.  Each year, the best senior projects are nominated by faculty to be featured at the annual Capstone Festival, where the entire community celebrates the seniors’ achievements.

URSC at MBC means:

Collaborating

  • in the pursuit of new knowledge and creative directions;
  • in one-on-one faculty mentorships and peer collaborations;
  • in partnership with institutions like the American Shakespeare Center and the Woodrow Wilson Birthplace and Presidential Library.

Discovering

  • how to put knowledge into action;
  • how your skills and perspectives can make a contribution to society;
  • how to develop your voice through an independent senior project.

Sharing Results

  • finding your voice and sharing it with others;
  • presenting in the annual Capstone Festival of senior projects.
Zora Neale Hurston once commented: ‘Research is formalized curiosity.
It is poking and prying with a purpose.’ Challenge yourself to ‘poke and pry.’
– Dr. Amy Tillerson, assistant professor of history